burrillville

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The Energy Facility Siting Board has temporarily suspended its review of energy developer Invenergy’s application to build a power plant in Burrillville. That decision has disappointed the town, residents and environmental groups.  

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Here’s a rundown of what’s happening this week with the proposed Burrillville power plant:

Public comment hearing

The Energy Facility Siting Board holds a hearing Wednesday evening for public comment on the proposed power plant in Burrillville. The hearing will take place at Warwick's Toll Gate High School auditorium at 6 p.m.

State legislators received scores based on their voting record on issues like land and water conservation, renewable energy, and transportation. The Environmental Council of Rhode Island, a coalition of local environmental organizations, said there’s room for improvement.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Lawmakers from Burrillville are calling on the Department of Health to recommend withholding approvals for the proposed power plant in the area, until changes are made to mitigate any potential negative health effects.

In a letter sent to an environmental health risk assessment toxicologist at the Department of Health, Representative Cale Keable and Senator Paul Fogarty list their concerns over the proposed power plant project.

Those include impacts on local drinking water, noise pollution, and emissions.

Courtesy Whitehouse Office

Governor Gina Raimondo meets Monday with critics and residents in Burrillville who oppose a proposed power plant. As Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse is declining to take a position on the project.

Whitehouse says his input on the proposed natural gas fired plant could hinder a local decision.

Activists and protester have been marching since Saturday in opposition to the power plant and in anticipation of meeting with governor.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The bills aimed at giving Burrillville residents a say in a tax treaty between the local town council and Invenergy, the company proposing to build a power plant, died in a senate committee this week.

Happy June, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

State Representative Cale Keable’s power plant bill took a step forward at the Statehouse yesterday. The House Environment & Natural Resources Committee voted 11-2 for the bill, which now moves to the house floor for consideration. 

Courtesy of the Rhode Island General Assembly

Two elected officials representing Burrillville are asking state regulators to deny approving a proposed power plant in their town. 

The state board considering a proposal for a power plant in Burrillville holds its first public hearing tonight at 6 p.m. in the auditorium at Burrillville High School in Harrisville. The power plant has generated opposition from several local groups.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The nonprofit that operates New England’s energy grid and wholesale energy market purchased power this week from two Rhode Island energy projects: Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm and Invenergy’s proposed power plant in Burrillville.

The offshore wind farm is scheduled to go online later this year, and the power plant has yet to gain approval from state officials.

The environmental advocacy nonprofit the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) has taken a new step this week to block the proposal for a new natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville. CLF is asking the state Energy Facility Siting Board, which is responsible for reviewing the power plant permit application, to send back the application to developer Invenergy because it’s incomplete. Rhode Island Public Radio Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza joined All Things Considered News Anchor Dave Fallon in the studio to share details. 

Environmental advocates at the Conservation Law Foundation are trying to intervene in the effort to build a new natural gas-fired power plant in the state. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza explains.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Want to take a trip through history with your own personal tour guide? Or better yet, want to send some relatives visiting for the holidays on an adventure? Try our audio walking tour of historic Harrisville, one of the main villages in the town of Burrillville.

Find out what it was like to work in a woolen mill in the late 1800s, meet the industrialist who embraced profit-sharing and paid vacations before most others had even heard of such practices, and follow the rise and fall of a town whose fate has been intertwined with the textile industry - until now.

Pages