burrillville

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The bills aimed at giving Burrillville residents a say in a tax treaty between the local town council and Invenergy, the company proposing to build a power plant, died in a senate committee this week.

Happy June, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

State Representative Cale Keable’s power plant bill took a step forward at the Statehouse yesterday. The House Environment & Natural Resources Committee voted 11-2 for the bill, which now moves to the house floor for consideration. 

Courtesy of the Rhode Island General Assembly

Two elected officials representing Burrillville are asking state regulators to deny approving a proposed power plant in their town. 

The state board considering a proposal for a power plant in Burrillville holds its first public hearing tonight at 6 p.m. in the auditorium at Burrillville High School in Harrisville. The power plant has generated opposition from several local groups.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The nonprofit that operates New England’s energy grid and wholesale energy market purchased power this week from two Rhode Island energy projects: Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm and Invenergy’s proposed power plant in Burrillville.

The offshore wind farm is scheduled to go online later this year, and the power plant has yet to gain approval from state officials.

The environmental advocacy nonprofit the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) has taken a new step this week to block the proposal for a new natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville. CLF is asking the state Energy Facility Siting Board, which is responsible for reviewing the power plant permit application, to send back the application to developer Invenergy because it’s incomplete. Rhode Island Public Radio Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza joined All Things Considered News Anchor Dave Fallon in the studio to share details. 

Environmental advocates at the Conservation Law Foundation are trying to intervene in the effort to build a new natural gas-fired power plant in the state. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza explains.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Want to take a trip through history with your own personal tour guide? Or better yet, want to send some relatives visiting for the holidays on an adventure? Try our audio walking tour of historic Harrisville, one of the main villages in the town of Burrillville.

Find out what it was like to work in a woolen mill in the late 1800s, meet the industrialist who embraced profit-sharing and paid vacations before most others had even heard of such practices, and follow the rise and fall of a town whose fate has been intertwined with the textile industry - until now.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

If there’s an epicenter of eating chicken in Rhode Island, it’s got to be Wright’s Farm in Burrillville. Frank Galleshaw the 3rd oversees this sprawling enterprise that began humbly more than 60 years ago.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This week, we bring you the sights and sounds of Burrillville, Rhode Island, with our occasional series One Square Mile. Today we head to Spring Lake, in the village of Glendale with Rhode Island Public Radio's morning host Chuck Hinman.

This local watering hole is one of the closest things the town has to a public beach.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Burrillville has become the unlikely epicenter for controversy over natural gas. The town is home to a natural gas-fired power plant, two pipelines, and two compressor stations to push gas through the pipelines.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

As part of our series One Square Mile: Burrillville, we're taking you on an insider's tour of a venerable Burrillville institution, Zambarano Hospital. In 1906, the Wallum Lake campus opened as a tuberculosis sanatorium. Today, the patients, and the times, have changed, but a sense of community remains.

Fighting Against Natural Gas

Activists with the environmental advocacy group Fighting Against Natural Gas (FANG) say they remain committed to their fight against an upgrade of Spectra Energy’s natural gas facility in Burrillville. Spectra Energy is responding to the protest.

Charges will mostly likely be dismissed for two climate activists, who were arrested earlier this month in Burrillville. They chained themselves to the front gate of a Spectra Energy facility to protest plans for an expansion.

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