carbon pollution

Battle With The Sea
6:30 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Battle With The Sea: What We Know And How We Know It

The relationship between global temperatures and carbon dioxide emissions is strong. When the temperature is high, Co2 is also high. Sources: Temp. Data from Zachos et al., 2001 Transformed as in Hansen & Sato, 2012; Co2 Data: Luthi et al., 2008
Courtesy of Sara Harris University of British Columbia

For the past three weeks, we've brought you stories about how climate change is already affecting Rhode Island. Narragansett Bay is getting warmer. Seas are rapidly rising. Shorelines are eroding. And we're experiencing more severe weather events. As part of our new ongoing series, Battle With The Sea, we take a step back this week to look at the science of how we know these changes are happening.

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Battle With The Sea
6:30 am
Thu December 4, 2014

Battle With The Sea: In Westerly, Beach Town Still Shoring Up For Future Storms

Tom Retano's three-bedroom house in Misquamicut is temporarily elevated off its original foundation, as work to permanently elevate the house 15 feet above sea level began this summer.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

Within four years, the town of Westerly experienced four major storms: the Great Flood of 2010, Hurricane Irene in 2011, Superstorm Sandy in 2012, and the February 2013 Nor’easter. Like many coastal cities and towns around the state, Westerly is also vulnerable to high tides that flood roads even without storms.

As part of our new ongoing series we’re calling “Battle With The Sea,” Rhode Island Public Radio’s environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza looks at how the town of Westerly is wrestling to shore up homes and businesses for future climate change threats.

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Battle With The Sea
8:16 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Battle With The Sea: Change Is Here (Part 2)

Matunuck residents Kevin McCloskey, Nancy Thoresen (middle), and Christa Thoresen share a photo opp with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI).
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

Last week, we brought you the story of West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin’s visit to Rhode Island. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse brought the Democratic senator, a strong coal advocate, to witness how climate change is wearing away the landscape here. Manchin learned from fishermen what challenges they’re facing in a changing ocean. Rhode Island Public Radio’s environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza brings you the second part of this story, when Manchin sees the effects climate change is having on land. 

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Battle With The Sea
5:50 am
Tue November 18, 2014

Battle With The Sea: Change Is Here (Part 1)

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) visited each other’s states to find common ground on climate change, an issue that polarizes their parties.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

Rapidly rising sea levels and severe weather threaten every community and natural habitat in the Ocean State, not just along the coast. Through a new ongoing series we’re calling, Battle With The Sea, Rhode Island Public Radio will examine the range and scope of these threats from city to city and town to town, and the solutions to prepare and strengthen Rhode Island for future threats to come.

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Environment
10:38 am
Wed November 12, 2014

Senator Whitehouse Praising U.S./China Climate Change Agreement

Sheldon Whitehouse on the Senate floor.

U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse says the new climate change deal between the U.S. and China is good news for Rhode Island.  

The U.S. is committing to reducing carbon emissions 28 percent by 2025.

Whitehouse sais though Rhode Island is not a major carbon polluting state, it’s already feeling the effects of climate change. “Particularly with rising sea levels, Narragansett Bay is 3 to 4 degrees warmer, the winter flounder catch has virtually collapsed,” said Whitehouse.

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Environment
3:39 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Rhode Island In Good Shape To Meet EPA's Carbon Emission Plan

Rhode Island is in good shape to meet the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed plan to reduce emissions from power plants, according to scientists with the Department of Environmental Management.

The EPA’s proposed plan is to cut emissions by 25 percent by 2020 and an additional 5 percent by 2030. It’s using emissions from 2005 as a baseline. The DEM’s supervising air quality specialist Frank Stevenson said the plan takes into consideration existing regional initiatives to cut carbon pollution. And that’s good news.

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