CCRI

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Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss reshaping the state’s workforce, increasing college completion rates, and what colleges need from K-12 schools. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, joins Political Roundtable to discuss a jump in the school’s enrollment this year, the federal rollback of protections for some young undocumented immigrants and more. 

Elisabeth Harrison

The announcement that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, will be phased out came the same day that many colleges and universities began a new school year. Dozens of New England students had sought protection under the program, which granted temporary reprieves to young people without documentation, if they were brought into the U.S. as children.

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This week Rhode Island lawmakers unveiled a $9.2 billion spending plan that avoids a major tax increase, while closing a $134 million deficit. How did they do it? Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison turns to our political analyst Scott MacKay.

A coalition of six mayors of Rhode Island cities and towns have announced support for Gov. Gina Raimondo’s plan to guarantee two years of tuition-free college at the state’s public higher education institutions.

The mayors are Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza, Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien, Warwick Mayor Scott Avedisian, Cumberland Mayor William Murray, Central Falls Mayor James Diossa,  and Johnston Mayor Joe Polisena.

Elisabeth Harrison

Maybe all you have to know about Gov. Gina Raimondo’s free tuition plan is this: Americans with no more than a high school education have now fallen so far behind in salaries that the earnings chasm has reached its widest point on record.

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Students at Rhode Island College reacted to Governor Gina Raimondo’s free tuition plan this week. The governor’s higher education proposal would cover the cost of tuition for in-state students for the first two years at the Community College of Rhode Island, or the last two years at the University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College.

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Students at Rhode Island’s public colleges and university could see a tuition hike next year. The state Board of Education is slated to vote Wednesday on a proposal that would increase the cost of Rhode Island College by about $600 a year. Tuition at the University of Rhode Island would go up by about $900, with larger increases for out-of-state students.

Post-Secondary Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said they need a total of about $30 million more dollars for the coming academic year.

Elisabeth Harrison

Starting in 2018, state colleges and universities will have to meet specific performance goals to receive increases in state funding, under a state law signed by Governor Gina Raimondo on Thursday.

The goals include increasing the number of students graduating on-time and adding graduates in fields that employers need. 

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Rhode Islanders have long supported Democrat Hillary Clinton. She won the 2008 primary against future President Barack Obama, but are residents ready to vote for her again?

RIPR file photo / CCRI

The community college of Rhode Island is partnering with submarine builder General Dynamics Electric Boat on a new satellite campus in Westerly. The facility will offer typical college classes as well as specialty technical training.

With the new partnership, Electric Boat will offer workforce development classes to its employees in fields including carpentry and pipefitting.  Electric Boat and CCRI will also begin a program for high schoolers, similar to vocational training, which could culminate in a job following graduation.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island's Council on Post-Secondary Education has appointed Meghan Hughes as president for the state community college system.

Hughes will succeed outgoing CCRI President Ray DiPasquale, who announced plans to step down after more than 10 years running CCRI.

The former executive director of Year Up Providence, a non profit organization dedicated to workforce education, Hughes will be the fifth president of CCRI.

She will take the helm of a community college system with campuses in Providence, Warwick, Newport, Lincoln and Westerly.

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The Community College of Rhode Island plans to open a new facility in Westerly to train workers for Electric Boat.

The company needs welders and other specialized employees to build nuclear submarines. Rhode Island Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said the new center is part of an effort to be more responsive to Electric Boat and other companies.

“And we’ve made a commitment to actually have a learning center at Westerly, which is really going to support job opportunity and access not only here in Rhode Island, but also at the Groton, Ct. site,” said Purcell.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A committee searching for the next president of Rhode Island’s community college meets Wednesday, as the group is narrows the field of candidates.


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Ray DiPasquale the President of the Community College of Rhode Island is stepping down. The decision comes after nearly a decade at the helm.

Di Pasquale began his first term as President in 2006.  During his tenure the school has seen record enrollments; graduating it’s largest-ever class in 2013. He also oversaw CCRI’s first-ever capital campaign which raised more $7 million.

In a statement Di Pasquale said serving as CCRI President was a “true privilege.”

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