Central Falls

RIPR FILE

Congressman David Cicilline is bringing the chair of the congressional Immigration Task Force to Rhode Island Wednesday evening to discuss the president’s executive order on immigration.  The public forum will focus on preventing residents from getting caught up in scams.

That’s been a problem since President Obama issued an executive order back in November that offers a legal reprieve to some in the country illegally and parents with children who are U.S. citizens.

The Golden Age Grease Caper gives us hope - at least those of us who are closing in on that rock solid verification of old age, that sure fire boarding pass for the bus to Foxwoods and the complimentary roll of quarters.

The Golden Age Grease caper provides one of those cherished, you’re-never-too-old moments that can be warmly, eagerly embraced as a ringing geezer declaration of independence. 

Personally, I’m taking it as irrefutable proof that 70 is the new 65.        

Lydia Rogers/File / RIPR

For more than 80 years, Theresa Landry has taught Rhode Islanders how to dance. But Landry will hang up her tap shoes and close her studio for good Saturday.

For generations, students have tapped and turned at the Theresa Landry Dance Studio on Dexter Street in Pawtucket. But the building’s been sold, forcing Landry to retire. And at 93 years old, she’s ready. “Well I think God is telling me that it’s time for me to have more time for myself and my family,” she said.

The Department of Labor and Training has stepped in to help the more than 70 workers laid off from the Osram Sylvania plant in Central Falls. The plant shut its doors last Friday.

Those former plant workers are now receiving benefits from a federal program that provides career counseling and helps them pay for amongst other things the commute to job training or to relocate. DLT spokesman Mike Healey said this federal program is more generous because it targets factory workers who tend to be older and have worked most of their lives in the plant.

A Rhode Island superior court judge has named a long-term receiver for the financially troubled Wyatt Detention Center. Lawyer Jonathan Savage will take the reins at the Central Falls prison, which has been losing money and facing declining inmate populations. Savage’s task will be to find a way to help dig the detention center out of the red.

The facility entered a form of bankruptcy in June after losing millions a year for years. It also owes nearly $100 million dollars in outstanding bond debt.

Pages