Charter Schools

National School Choice Week Kicks Off In RI

Jan 23, 2017

"National School Choice Week" kicked off on Monday with  more than 20,000 events expected across the country to promote broader education options, such as charter schools. In Rhode Island, organizers had planned a series of information sessions, policy discussions, and open houses at area schools.  

The main event, a school choice rally, will be held Thursday just after noon at the Rhode Island State House.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Rep. Patricia Morgan (R-West Warwick), the new minority leader in the Rhode Island House, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss charter schools and what's next for the House GOP caucus under her leadership.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza says he supports an expansion by charter school group Achievement First. But a smaller expansion than the group is seeking. Achievement First wants to add more than 2,000 new seats by 2026.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Charter school expansion will be up for discussion Tuesday at the state Council on Elementary and Secondary Education. One proposal from charter management group Achievement First has generated objections in Providence. But the state’s education commissioner is backing the plan.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island Education Commissioner Ken Wagner is backing a plan to add 2,192 seats to the charter for Achievement First, a mayoral academy that currently operates two elementary schools in Providence. 

Just a few weeks remain until 2017, a year bound to be filled with political drama. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Achievement First in Providence wants to add a third K-8 school and move forward with its plan to open a high school, and the Segue Middle School in Central Falls wants to add an elementary school. Those are just two of the charter school proposals on tap at the Rhode Island Department of Education. 

RIPR FILE

Voters head to the polls Tuesday for primary elections in Rhode Island, and one of those primaries will fill a House seat formerly held by Ray Gallison. The Democrat resigned under a law enforcement probe likely to include legislative grants, given to an organization with Gallison on the payroll. Rhode Island Public Radio Political Analyst Scott MacKay discussed the race with News Director Elisabeth Harrison.

RIPR FILE

Education advocates say there’s a lot to like about the state’s new budget for public schools. That includes new funding for special education and early childhood education. But some advocates are concerned about the future of charter schools.

For more on that, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke to Daniela Fairchild from the Rhode Island Campaign for Achievement Now, a group that advocates for charter schools and higher standards for all schools, among other issues.

Budget Changes Charter School Funding

Jun 8, 2016
Ian Donnis / RIPR

The House Finance Committee has changed the structure of payments made by local school districts to charter schools and mayoral academies.

Governor Raimondo had proposed an across-the-board decrease in tuition payments made to charter schools, but the House committee voted to give municipalities more options when it comes to reimbursing the charter schools.

State Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Bonus Q&A this week to discuss charter schools, the outlook on ethics reform, her future plans, promoting green jobs, leadership at the state Board of Elections, and other issues.

Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo said Wednesday she would veto at least one bill designed to make it harder to open new charter schools. Speaking at an on-the-record lunch with reporters, Raimondo discussed a bill that would require local elected officials to sign off on new or expanding charter schools.

Governor Gina Raimondo joins Bonus Q+A to discuss her jobs strategy, truck tolls, charter schools, whether RI should legalize marijuana, Hillary Clinton, and more.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo’s $9 billion budget proposal would increase funding for public schools and give a small bump to colleges and universities.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The House Committee on Health, Education and Welfare has passed a bill that would make it harder to open new charter schools in Rhode Island.

The bill requires approval from the city or town council of any municipality that would send students to the proposed school. Current state law requires approval only from the State Department of Education.

Charter school leaders have said the bill will curtail the growth of charter schools, especially those that serve multiple cities and towns.

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