children

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo has called for a complete overhaul of the state’s child welfare agency. A new audit has found DCYF failed to follow basic accounting and purchasing practices. With more about the problems and the proposed fixes, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins news director Elisabeth Harrison in the studio.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons license

Exposure to a trio of common chemicals can affect developing babies’ brains. But it’s unclear what role those chemicals play as kids get older. One Brown University researcher aims to find out.

Citing data that shows an increase in children living in poverty, Gov. Gina Raimondo has reinstated the Children’s Cabinet. The group has not met for close to a decade. It’s charged with coordinating services for children across state agencies. One of the founders of the Children’s Cabinet, former Cranston senator Thomas Izzo, says reconvening the group sends a message that child welfare matters.

“If you don’t have forceful proponents and advocates within the legislature or policymakers," said Izzo, "kids’ issues get lost very quickly.”

Rhode Island’s ranking for child well-being has dropped from last year, according to a new report from the child advocacy group Kids Count. 

45 children in the care of Rhode Island’s child welfare agency are currently listed as missing. Rhode Island Public Radio learned about the number missing after a 14-year-old girl in the agency's care was found in New Jersey with an alleged sex trafficker. The Department of Children, Youth, and Family says she was lured away from a group home. Spokesman Denis Riel says the agency takes its responsibility for children seriously.

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