Clean Ocean Access

Dave Hansen / Newport Daily News

Water quality along the Aquidneck Island shoreline has improved overall, but isn’t perfect, according to a new report from a local environmental nonprofit.

RIPR FILE

In Newport, volunteers are gathering on the city’s Cliff Walk to clean up the tourist attraction and the ocean access points near it. The event is organized by the Aquidneck Island-based nonprofit Clean Ocean Access.

Clean Ocean Access director Dave McLaughlin says the group has collected some 50 tons of trash during area beach cleanups over the last decade.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The non-profit Clean Ocean Access is celebrating its 11th year of ocean cleanup along the Aquidneck shoreline with a new 10-year report outlining its environmental impact.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Earlier this spring, we brought you a report from our series Battle With The Sea about the impact of climate change on Aquidneck Island's drinking water with warmer temperatures, heavier rains, and more intense storms. But there’s more to the story. We pick up where we left off.

URI/RI Sea Grant

With more than 500 public drinking water suppliers in the state, the Rhode Island Department of Health is worried about how they will cope with climate-related changes like intense rains, rising seas, and warmer temperatures. For the next installment of our series, Battle With The Sea, environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza heads to Newport, home to one of the most vulnerable drinking water supplies in the state when it comes to climate change.

Cliff Walk Repairs Draw Surfer Ire

Apr 10, 2013
RIPR

The Newport City Council will be reviewing a plan at Wednesday's meeting to rebuild the famed Cliff Walk damaged last year by Superstorm Sandy. Many in the town are concerned about how a proposed plan could alter the ocean waves that give the historic Breakers mansion its name.