climate change

Juan Rodriguez

Eileen Sheehan lives only about a couple hundred feet away from the Westport River. Through the windows in her living room, you can see light from the sun twinkling off the water. 

However, Sheehan said these days, it's depressing to look out into the river because of what's been happening to the salt marsh islands. 

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The irony was hard to miss.

The Aquarium MBTA station was closed due to flooding, and the aquarium itself, nearby on Boston's Central Wharf, was closed out of caution for its visitors.

University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center

Researchers at the University of Rhode Island are leading a new project in the Philippines to increase the number of fish in their waters.

 


Avory Brookins / RIPR

National Grid's response to power outages caused by a major storm last October was too slow, causing a 36-hour delay in power restoration, according to a report released Monday by Rhode Island state regulators.

Avory Brookins / RIPR

An advocate for environmental justice says communities of color need to take charge of their own economies to better-prepare for the effects of climate change.


Hannah Barkley / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have released a study that found ocean acidification could weaken coral skeletons by up to 20 percent by the end of the century.


A sadly familiar story dominates the news once again.  Meanwhile, the political beat remains busy in the Biggest Little. As usual your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Lobster conservation techniques pioneered by Maine fishermen helped drive a population boom that's led to record landings this century. That's the conclusion of new, peer-reviewed research published this month. 

The paper also finds that lobstermen in southern New England could have used the same techniques to prevent or at least slow the collapse of their fisheries — even in the face of climate change — but they didn't.

KARIM D. GHANTOUS / CREATIVE COMMONS

Following the October storm that cut power to thousands of customers, researchers say it may be time to devise new models to predict storm outages. Emmanouil Anagnostou is a professor at the University of Connecticut. He says existing models do really well at building connections between historic and new storm data. But they’re not great at predicting more extreme weather events.

Jason Moon / NHPR

As New Hampshire’s coastline prepares for a world with rising seas and stronger storms, communities and homeowners have different options, none of them simple: seawalls, raised structures, a retreat from the shoreline.

Kenneth C. Zirkel / Wikimedia Commons

A new study recently released by The Nature Conservancy, a global wildlife conservation group, has found the majority of coastal sites, such as wetlands and salt marshes, in Rhode Island and Massachusetts are vulnerable to the effects of climate change. 


Lynn Arditi / RIPR

People’s Power and Light, a local nonprofit that advocates for clean energy, says Rhode Island and Massachusetts residents will have to pay to adapt to more frequent and intense storms. 


Avory Brookins / RIPR

John Kerry, former secretary of state and Democratic U.S. senator for Massachusetts, wants environmentalists to bring their activism to the voting booths.

Avory Brookins / RIPR

Lawmakers and environmentalists are disappointed in and concerned about the federal Environmental Protection Agency's decision to stop three agency scientists from talking about their research on climate change. 

City of Boston

Boston’s Chief Resilience Officer is warning that people of color are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. 


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