climate change

City of Boston

Boston’s Chief Resilience Officer is warning that people of color are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. 


Avory Brookins / RIPR

As my tour guide, Bill Eccleston, and I walked through the dirt, twigs and puddles of the George Washington Wildlife Management Area in Burrillville, we heard a bird call above us. 

Avory Brookins / RIPR

Jane Goodall, renowned chimp expert and conservationist, spread her message of hope for the environment during a lecture Tuesday in front of nearly 5,700 people at the University of Rhode Island.


Avory Brookins / RIPR

Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo has created a new position called "chief resiliency officer" to help the Ocean State better prepare for climate change. 


Jesse Costa / WBUR


  The consequences of climate change, experts say, will disproportionately affect low-income communities and communities of color.

Avory Brookins / RIPR

Climate Action RI, an environmental advocacy coalition, held a rally Saturday outside of the National Governors Association's annual summer meeting at the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence.


RIPR File Photo

State leaders and members of the scientific community are expressing concern after President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. will pull out of the Paris Climate Accord. At a White House press conference Thursday,  the President said the U.S. would exit the 190-nation agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The only other nations that remain outside of the agreement are Nicaragua and Syria.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons/ Wikimedia Commons

Local environmental experts believe President Donald Trump’s proposed budget for the Environmental Protection Agency could have devastating effects on the Ocean State.


Dawn / flickr

A new heat advisory policy for the northeast will take effect this summer thanks to a study published today that looks at the relationship between heat and health in New England.

RIPR

Rhode Islanders will be sending a message to President Donald Trump tomorrow morning that he needs to address climate change as a part of a national movement demanding climate action.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Those early hints of spring can call to a gardener like a siren song. Yet the urge to get one’s seeds into dirt can be dangerous: most seedlings won’t survive a single frost. To help with that, gardeners use 30-year averages that predict when the last frost will probably occur. The thing is, in New England, climate change has temperatures rising relatively quickly.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse was invited by U.S. Sen. John McCain to the Munich Security Conference this weekend. One of the biggest think tanks of its kind, Whitehouse took the conference as an opportunity to discuss climate security and other security concerns.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Donald Trump’s surprise victory has prompted climate ministers from around the world to issue a joint statement about the need for the whole international community, including the United States, to remain committed to the Paris Climate Accords.

Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza talked to a Brown University climate policy expert, who is at this year’s United Nations climate summit in Morocco, to find out how leaders are taking the news.

Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Conservationists have kicked off a project this week to shore up thirty acres of salt marsh at the John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge. It’s one of the larger projects underway to make the state’s salt marshes more resistant to climate change.

Courtesy of Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation

The Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation is kicking off a new project to collect data on black sea bass, a species that has moved north in search of cooler water.

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