climate change

RIPR FILE

  A Brown University professor and a climate expert is adding his voice in opposition to a power plant proposed in Burrillville.

J. Timmons Roberts filed written testimony on behalf of the Conservation Law Foundation, one of several groups participating in hearings for the proposed power plant. Roberts said the plant will make it impossible for Rhode Island to meet emission reduction goals outlined in the state’s climate change law.

Courtesy of Roger Williams University

In an effort to slow the effects of climate change, Roger Williams University is spearheading a tree-planting campaign. Trees can absorb and store rising concentrations of carbon dioxide, which are responsible for global warming.

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

The spread of Zika virus may have come as a surprise to some. But not to Julia Gold. The Rhode Island Department of Health’s climate change expert speaks with Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay for this week’s The Pulse about the future of mosquito and other vector-borne diseases and how the state can prepare and respond. 

 

The state board considering a proposal for a power plant in Burrillville holds its first public hearing tonight at 6 p.m. in the auditorium at Burrillville High School in Harrisville. The power plant has generated opposition from several local groups.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Many of Rhode Island’s 18th century buildings have survived a number of coastal storms in the past: the Great September Gale of 1815, the 1938 Hurricane, and most recently Superstorm Sandy. 

The Bottom Line: Should RI Tax Carbon Emissions?

Mar 11, 2016

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

Photo Courtesy of Pam Rubinoff

The Hurricane of 1938 toppled some 275 million trees across New England. Today – with more trees and more buildings  – state officials see wind damage as a statewide threat because of climate change and the potential for more frequent, extreme weather events. In the next installment of our series Battle With the Sea, we look at how some homeowners are preparing to withstand winds with the force of a hurricane. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Over the course of three days, a team of experts from around the country helped Providence plan for the impacts of climate change through a grant-funded series of events called ResilientPVD Lab.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Climate Change

Feb 2, 2016

Climate change is a hot button issue, that’s for sure. Reputable survey after survey indicate that the majority of people believe that climate change is a serious problem. And then we get to the hard part: what to do about it, and about that there’s less consensus.  But what we do know is that a stalwart group of Rhode Islanders is out in front, taking the lead in remarkably earnest efforts to address this intimidating challenge.  Timmons Roberts couldn’t be more pleased.  As Mahatma Gandhi said, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”
 

   

Timmons Roberts is professor of environmental sociology at Brown University, and helped lead the Resilient Rhode Island team in supporting the passage of the state’s first comprehensive climate change legislation.  In 2016 he’s helping a coalition working on a bill to reduce emissions and create jobs through putting a price on carbon.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A new bill that puts a tax on carbon has garnered broad support from environmental advocates, businesses, and religious groups. Supporters believe the bill, called Energize Rhode Island, will help reduce carbon emissions and stimulate the economy. 

The environmental advocacy nonprofit the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) has taken a new step this week to block the proposal for a new natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville. CLF is asking the state Energy Facility Siting Board, which is responsible for reviewing the power plant permit application, to send back the application to developer Invenergy because it’s incomplete. Rhode Island Public Radio Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza joined All Things Considered News Anchor Dave Fallon in the studio to share details. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Block Island has been dubbed one of “the last great places” in the western hemisphere. It has a shoreline largely untouched by development. But on the northwest corner of island, storms have been washing away at the bluffs, unearthing what used to be the island’s landfill.

RIPR File Photo

Global leaders in Paris over the weekend approved a historic international agreement to slow the warming of the planet. Here at home, the Rhode Island federal delegation is praising the climate accord, calling it a victory for the planet and future generations. Local environmental advocates and climate change experts say they are proud of programs New England has initiated to reduce acid rain and carbon emissions from power plants. Now they’re hopeful the Paris Climate Pact will steer the region away from natural gas.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A new house in Matunuck will sustain winds of more than 130 miles per hour. It’s the first home under construction in New England built to disaster certification standards known as FORTIFIED.

After a string of severe storms in recent years, the state hopes to shift to a more rigorous building code so that homes can sustain high winds and water damage.

Rhode Island Public Radio

This week in Paris, world leaders launched a major climate change summit. The two-week meeting is aimed at negotiating an agreement to reduce carbon emissions. A group of Brown University professors and students is also at the summit. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza spoke with the group to hear what the next two weeks have in store.  

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