Community College of Rhode Island

RIPR FILE

On Wednesday lawmakers will consider arming campus police at Rhode Island College and the Community College of Rhode Island. The University of Rhode Island armed campus police in 2015.

The bill would mandate the arming of campus police at all state colleges and universities. The legislation comes amid a growing debate about arming school personnel, after recent, deadly shootings at places like Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

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The Community College of Rhode Island has been in talks with India-based tech company Infosys for months about a training partnership. The talks were part of the negotiation that brought a new Infosys design hub to Providence.

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In a nation divided along partisan political lines, it can feel like few things still bring people together. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has an idea he says may help. 


RIPR File Photo

More than 1,400 Rhode Island students have enrolled at the Community College of Rhode Island through a new program that gives students two years tuition-free at the state’s only public junior college.

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Political scientists recall a time when elected officials campaigned for office, then laid off the political pitches while they governed. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay says those days are long gone.  

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It's been a difficult week for people under DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program protecting thousands of undocumented young people from deportation, if their parents brought them to this country as children. 

Ian Donnis

Gov. Gina Raimondo hosted a media conference call with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam Thursday. It’s the latest move in Democrat Raimondo’s efforts to rally support for her plan to provide two years of free tuition at the state’s public institutions.

Courtesy of URI

Gov. Gina Raimondo’s signature plan for free tuition at Rhode Island public colleges has generated opposition.  RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says she may have to make some changes to deal with the new statehouse landscape. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo is poised Monday to announce a major education initiative that would make the first two years of public higher education tuition-free for Rhode Island high school graduates enrolled at the state’s three public colleges – the Community College of Rhode Island, the University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College, according to Statehouse sources.

The state Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday to raise tuition at Rhode Island’s three public colleges and universities. The increases would be small, but they will still have an impact on students and their families, and on state efforts to increase the number of college graduates.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Council on Higher Education wants to freeze tuition at state colleges and universities for the upcoming academic year. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison sat down with State Higher Education Commissioner Jim Purcell to ask about the cost of a college degree.

RIPR FILE

The Community College of Rhode Island plans to open a new facility in Westerly to train workers for Electric Boat.

The company needs welders and other specialized employees to build nuclear submarines. Rhode Island Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said the new center is part of an effort to be more responsive to Electric Boat and other companies.

“And we’ve made a commitment to actually have a learning center at Westerly, which is really going to support job opportunity and access not only here in Rhode Island, but also at the Groton, Ct. site,” said Purcell.

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island's council for higher education has voted against tuition increases at the University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College and the Community College of Rhode Island. 

In a letter, Governor Gina Raimondo had urged the council to keep tuition at current levels to make college more accessible to students.

"We must make it a priority to ensure that students who work hard, and want to pursue higher education, aren't prevented from doing so by high costs," Raimondo wrote.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A committee searching for the next president of Rhode Island’s community college meets Wednesday, as the group is narrows the field of candidates.


RIPR

College professors are raising concerns about a plan to tie state funding for higher education with performance. The proposal calls for targets in areas like graduation rates and degrees in high demand fields. Schools would have to meet the targets to qualify for part of their state funding starting after 2016.

Community College of Rhode Island English Professor Anthony Amore says students and faculty need to play a role in setting the performance measures.

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