Courts

Jeremiah S. Jeremiah Jr., the former chief judge of RI's Family Court, died Sunday at age 80, a court spokesman said.

Courts spokesman Craig Berke said details were not immediately available on the cause of Judge Jeremiah's death.

According to Berke, Jeremiah was appointed associate justice of the Family Court in March 1986. A year later, in March 1987, he was sworn in as Chief Judge. He retired June 30, 2010. Jeremiah previously served in the Cranston City Solicitor’s office from 1963 to 1984, and as executive counsel for then-Governor Edward DiPrete from 1984 to 1986.

Three years after the Rhode Island Courts began working to update a 31-year-old media policy, the process is continuing.

According to court spokesman Craig Berke, a second revision of guidelines "with a nod to today's technology" is under review by the state Supreme Court.

"There is no timetable for the next step," Berke said via email, although he said there will be discussion at some point involving judges, magistrates, court administrators and media representatives.

The year ended as 2013 began: with Rhode Island's political/media class fixated on the looming race for governor in 2014. At least we're a bit closer now. With that in mind, welcome back to my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and your cordially invited to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Tracy Breton, who covered courts and legal issues at the Providence Journal for 40 years, says an ongoing series of buyouts and layoffs on Fountain Street will make it increasingly difficult for the paper to offer investigative reporting and in-depth journalism.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Tracy Breton worked her final day on the job at the Providence Journal last Friday after covering courts and trials for 40 years. Breton was part of the investigative team that won a 1994 Pulitzer Prize for the ProJo, and she covered the downfall of two Rhode Island Supreme Court chief justices, Joseph Bevilacqua and Thomas Fay. Breton sat down to talk about her four decades of covering the courts and her future plans.

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