Deepwater Wind is still on schedule to complete the first construction phase of the Block Island Wind Farm, despite issues related to equipment reliability and worker safety. Contractors have about one more month of construction to go, according to Grover Fugate, the executive director of the Coastal Resources Management Council.

Fugate said Deepwater Wind has gotten its contractors to implement safety recommendations and replace inadequate equipment for choppy ocean conditions.


The Coastal Resources Management Council will discuss a subcommittee’s recommendation to approve Deepwater Wind’s proposed Block Island Wind Farm Tuesday. This may be another big vote for the project.

Bradley Campbell / RIPR

A subcommittee of the Coastal Resources Management Council set the final public hearing to discuss Deepwater Wind’s proposed ocean wind farm for today. 

The subcommittee in charge of these hearings has set aside six hours for public comments.  They may also ask Deepwater Wind some final questions to help them decide whether to recommend the project to the CRMC for approval.

The full council will consider these hearings, the subcommittee’s recommendation, and staff report before it votes on the project.


A subcommittee of the Coastal Resources Management Council will hold its first public hearing today on Deepwater Wind’s permit application to build an off-shore wind farm in Rhode Island waters.

The hearing is the first of two scheduled for this month.

Deepwater proposes to build a wind farm with five turbines, 3 miles southeast of Block Island, and an underwater transmission cable that would run from Block Island to the Rhode Island mainland.


The Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council says it does not object with the wind farm projects off Block Island proposed by developer Deepwater Wind.

Four CRMC staff members shared this position, along with 17 recommended stipulations, in a 53-page staff report earlier this week in advance of a public hearing on the project’s permit application next week.

A subcommittee of the Coastal Resources Management Council has denied Deepwater Wind’s request to waive a $700,000 fee. Deepwater Wind wanted the application fee waived for its offshore wind farm off Block Island.

After more than two hours of testimony and deliberation, the Ocean Special Area Management Plan subcommittee voted 4 – 1 to deny the fee waiver.