Curt Schilling

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The latest twist in the never-ending 38  Studios soap opera is the joust over grand jury secrecy.  RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this spat is more about politics than legal precedent.

RIPR File Photo

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin has filed an objection in Rhode Island Superior Court to Gov. Gina Raimondo’s legal petition to release the grand jury records from the state police 38 Studios case. Kilmartin’s objection did not include his reasoning for blocking release of the grand jury files, which Raimondo has sought to open up.

RIPR File Photo

38 Studios is the Rhode Island scandal that just won’t go away. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders how the state can put this mess in the rear-view mirror.

Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling is heading to the conservative media organization Breitbart. The former sports star has been increasingly visible in the news.

Two weeks ago, Schilling penned an opinion piece in the Providence Journal in which he blamed then-governor Lincoln Chafee for the failure of 38 Studios. Schilling helped found the video game company, which subsequently went bankrupt, after receiving tens of millions of dollars in support from the state.

It's not every week that begins with 38 Studios and ends with a yoga pants dispute in Barrington. But that's why Rhode Island is the gift that keeps giving. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips are welcome and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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Curt Schilling said Tuesday he was surprised to learn in 2010 that most of state reps voting on a $125 million job development program were unaware that a big chunk of the money was "earmarked" for 38 Studios.

Curt Schilling took to the op-ed page of The Providence Journal Sunday to renew his argument that former Governor Lincoln Chafee bears a large part of the responsibility for the failure of 38 Studios in 2012.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave discuss the state of the 38 Studios settlements. In the latest deal, executives from the failed video game company, including former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, agreed to pay $2.5 million to the state. This was the second settlement announced this month; the other was worth $25 million, with financial firms Wells Fargo and Barclays Capital.

Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein approved Friday the latest settlement over the failure of 38 Studios. Under terms of the deal, an insurance policy for Curt Schilling and three other company executives will pay the state $2.5 million.

The settlement was announced earlier this week. The mediator in the case said given the uncertainty of a trial, it was better for the state to accept the settlement.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Red Sox star Curt Schilling and three other former 38 Studios executives have reached a preliminary $2.5 million settlement with the State of Rhode Island over the failure of the video-game company in 2012.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The state Commerce Corporation announced Tuesday it has reached a $25.6 million settlement with two of the defendants in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios, Wells Fargo Securities and Barclays Capital.

Ian Donnis

State Police and Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will pursue no criminal charges after a years-long investigation into 38 Studios, the company that won a $75 million public subsidy to move to Rhode Island, then went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

In announcing results of the investigation, State  Police Col. Steven O'Donnell said a bad business deal doesn't necessarily provide grounds for a criminal indictment.

It's peak presidential politics in Rhode Island, with a trio of candidates set to stump in the state this weekend. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

John Bender / RIPR

The US Securities & Exchange Commission on Monday announced that it has charged Wells Fargo Securities and the state agency formerly known as the Economic Development Corporation with defrauding investors in the municipal bond offering used to finance 38 Studios in Rhode Island.


Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former House Finance chairman Steve Costantino said through his lawyer Wednesday that he's willing to return to Rhode Island to answer questions about the state's ill-fated investment in the video game company 38 Studios.

"Mr. Costantino is aware of the intent of the committee you chair to have him appear for testimony on January 14, 2016," lawyer Marc DeSisto writes in a letter to Oversight Chairwoman Karen MacBeth. "I have been authorized by Mr. Costantino to advise you that he is willing to appear and testify before your committee without the need to utilize a subpoena."

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