Curt Schilling

Now comes another high-tech blabber seeking to blame Gov. Lincoln Chafee for the Curt Schilling -38 Studios fiasco that was actually done in the waning days of Gov. Donald Carcieri’s administration.

John Smedley, president of Sony Online Entertainment, slammed Chafee in a series of twitter comments this week. But his arguments are so incongruous that it is very difficult to take him seriously.

It’s more like he has been sampling the new legal stuff in Denver or Seattle.

As Rhode Island works to recover some of its investment in failed video game company 38 Studios, the company’s famous founder is now battling cancer.

Curt Schilling made the announcement in a statement released through ESPN.  The former pitcher for the Boston Red Sox did not indicate what type of cancer, nor whether he is likely to recover.

Schilling faces a lawsuit from Rhode Island’s economic development agency, claiming he and others at 38 Studios failed to fully inform the state of the financial precariousness of the company.

The auctioning of intellectual property from defunct video game maker 38 studios resulted in the sale of two of the five lots up for bid. The assets were part of the video game company owned by baseball legend Curt Schilling.

The two lots going to the highest bidder included the games “Rise of Nations” and “Rise of Legends” and all of their intellectual property. The other lot sold held the trademark for Big Huge Games, a Maryland-based video game company owned by 38 Studios.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Intellectual property rights for 38 Studios, the failed video game that left Rhode Island taxpayers on the hook for $90 million, were slated to hit the auction block Wednesday. Nick Jimenez, executive vice president with Heritage Global Auctions, says via email there will be "more to report after the sales process is completed in the coming days." In the interim, an update on related developments:

The state’s lawsuit over failed video game company 38 Studios will move forward. Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein dismissed some of the counts, but allowed key parts of the state’s lawsuit to move ahead.

file / RIPR

Rhode Island’s lawsuit over failed video game company 38 Studios will move forward. Superior Court judge Michael Silverstein dismissed some of the counts, but allows key parts of the state’s lawsuit to move ahead.

(Read the judge's 98-page decision here.)

When video game maker 38 Studios went belly up after receiving a $75 million state loan guaranty, it left taxpayers in the lurch for roughly $100 million.

Former Red Sox star Curt Schilling says stress from 38 Studios’ business problems was part of why he suffered a heart attack in 2011.  Schilling revealed the health problem in an interview with the Boston Sunday Globe.

Schilling tells the Globe he experienced chest pains while watching his wife run in the New York Marathon in November 2011. That was seven months before 38 Studios went bankrupt, leaving Rhode Island taxpayers on the hook for close to 100 million dollars. Schilling says he was treated after returning to Boston.


A legislative committee Wednesday held the fourth in an ongoing series of oversight hearings on Rhode Island’s investment in failed video game company 38 Studios. Committee members had different views on the value of the meeting.

Don Boorman / RIPR

The House Oversight Committee is set Wednesday to examine the state’s losing investment in failed video game maker 38 Studios.

The General Assembly ended the legislative session last month. But members of the House Oversight Committee are returning to Smith Hill  to examine Rhode Island’s misadventure with 38 Studios.

The discussion will focus on documents obtained from the state Economic Development Corporation about the EDC’s approval of bonds for 38 Studios. The video game company was lured here with a $75 million  state-backed guaranteed loan in 2010.

Will Rhode Island ever get beyond the shadow of the 38 Studios-Curt Schilling  disaster. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on why state government so far has not developed options for putting this behind us.

President John F. Kennedy said famously that ``life is unfair.’’ Some men,’’ he noted, ‘’are killed in a war, some men are wounded and some men never leave the country.’’

Don Borman / RIPR

Gov. Lincoln Chafee’s administration is doing a financial analysis on the cost of not paying back investors who underwrote the state’s loan guarantee for failed video game maker 38 Studios.

The governor has said it’s important for the state’s reputation to pay back the 38 Studios loan. Chafee’s spokeswoman, Christine Hunsinger, said several state agencies and department heads are conducting an analysis on the cost of not paying back those bondholders.


Lawyers for the defunct 38 Studios video game company were back in court Wednesday, asking a judge to dismiss a lawsuit brought against them by the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation. The suit alleges that executives of the defunct Curt Schilling enterprise deliberately misled state officials about the financial viability of the company to gain a $75 million state-backed loan.

The Sunday New York Times is out with Matt Bai's lengthy and well-written overview of Rhode Island's disastrous investment in 38 Studios, former Red Sox star Curt Schilling's bankrupt video game company. Bai's story doesn't offer much in the way of new findings, but it will expose the Ocean State's folly to a broad audience of influentials.

So now the most ridiculous and irresponsible decision of former Gov. Donald Carcieri’s tenure has come home to roost. That, of course, would be the decision to gamble $100 million or so of the taxpayers’ money on Curt Schilling’s ill-fated 38 Studios video game company.

The company is now bankrupt. As ProJo State House veteran Katherine Gregg reports, the budget proposal from Governor Lincoln Chafee, the most vocal opponent of this fiasco during the 2010 governor’s race, has proposed making the initial $2.5 million payment to bondholders.

Gov. Chafee: Having Trouble Filling EDC Board

Mar 5, 2013

Gov. Lincoln Chafee says he’s having some trouble getting people to serve on the board of the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation. Seven of the 13 board seats are empty and the agency has no director.  

Chafee says people he’s approached are reluctant to serve because of the high-profile nature of the troubled agency.