Curt Schilling

As Rhode Island works to recover some of its investment in failed video game company 38 Studios, the company’s famous founder is now battling cancer.

Curt Schilling made the announcement in a statement released through ESPN.  The former pitcher for the Boston Red Sox did not indicate what type of cancer, nor whether he is likely to recover.

Schilling faces a lawsuit from Rhode Island’s economic development agency, claiming he and others at 38 Studios failed to fully inform the state of the financial precariousness of the company.

The auctioning of intellectual property from defunct video game maker 38 studios resulted in the sale of two of the five lots up for bid. The assets were part of the video game company owned by baseball legend Curt Schilling.

The two lots going to the highest bidder included the games “Rise of Nations” and “Rise of Legends” and all of their intellectual property. The other lot sold held the trademark for Big Huge Games, a Maryland-based video game company owned by 38 Studios.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Intellectual property rights for 38 Studios, the failed video game that left Rhode Island taxpayers on the hook for $90 million, were slated to hit the auction block Wednesday. Nick Jimenez, executive vice president with Heritage Global Auctions, says via email there will be "more to report after the sales process is completed in the coming days." In the interim, an update on related developments:

The state’s lawsuit over failed video game company 38 Studios will move forward. Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein dismissed some of the counts, but allowed key parts of the state’s lawsuit to move ahead.

file / RIPR

Rhode Island’s lawsuit over failed video game company 38 Studios will move forward. Superior Court judge Michael Silverstein dismissed some of the counts, but allows key parts of the state’s lawsuit to move ahead.

(Read the judge's 98-page decision here.)

When video game maker 38 Studios went belly up after receiving a $75 million state loan guaranty, it left taxpayers in the lurch for roughly $100 million.

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