DACA

Isaac Bowen / CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

Thursday is the last chance for recipients of the federal immigration program Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals to renew their status. After that, the federal government has announced it will wind down the program, which allows residents brought into the country illegally as children to remain and work without fear of deportation.

Nothing like a long afternoon-into-night at the Rhode Island Statehouse to add a dash of September excitement, right? We've got it all covered, so thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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Political scientists recall a time when elected officials campaigned for office, then laid off the political pitches while they governed. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay says those days are long gone.  

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo announced Monday new efforts to aid some of the estimated 1,200 "Dreamers" in the Ocean State who could face deportation.

Jake Rustenhoven / CC BY 2.0

The Capital Good Fund, a nonprofit micro-lender, has begun offering loans to Rhode Island residents hoping to renew or apply for the first time for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. DACA allows undocumented residents brought as children to the U.S. to avoid deportation.

Ximena Conde / RIPR

President Donald Trump’s administration is seeking to reverse the Obama administration’s policy of deferring deportation of young immigrants brought to this country illegally as children.  

Will Hart / Creative Commons License via Wikimedia Commons

It's been a difficult week for people under DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program protecting thousands of undocumented young people from deportation, if their parents brought them to this country as children. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, joins Political Roundtable to discuss a jump in the school’s enrollment this year, the federal rollback of protections for some young undocumented immigrants and more. 

RIPR FILE

The end of the immigration policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA could leave thousands of undocumented young people without federal protection from deportation. And legal experts say most of them will find it difficult to apply for citizenship.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

 

The future for thousands of young people in Massachusetts is unclear after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the Trump administration would end the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

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Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is joining with counterparts in other states to sue the federal government over the end of the DACA program. The U.S. Justice Department announced Tuesday that it would end the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The program, implemented in 2012, allowed undocumented residents brought to the country as children to defer deportation.

Elisabeth Harrison

The announcement that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, will be phased out came the same day that many colleges and universities began a new school year. Dozens of New England students had sought protection under the program, which granted temporary reprieves to young people without documentation, if they were brought into the U.S. as children.

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President Donald Trump's likely repeal of a program that protects some undocumented immigrants from deportation would threaten thousands across New England, placing some in dire situations.

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The heads of three Rhode Island universities join a growing list of leaders at higher learning institutions opposing President Trump’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries.