David Dooley

It's not every week that begins with 38 Studios and ends with a yoga pants dispute in Barrington. But that's why Rhode Island is the gift that keeps giving. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips are welcome and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

URI President David Dooley joins Bonus Q&A this week to talk about college affordability, the status of Wexford Science & Technology's proposed life-science park in the I-195 District, URI's role in helping the state's growing Latino community, and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Curt Schilling's comments on 38 Studios; ballot question 4, which would allocate $45 million in borrowing to modernize an engineering building at URI and create a so-called innovation campus; and what do about student debt.

Bottom Line: South Street Landing Update

Oct 9, 2015

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave sit down with University of Rhode Island President David Dooley for an update on the South Street Landing project, a long-awaited nursing school for URI and Rhode Island College.

Dooley also discusses URI's future plans in Providence, including a potential partnership with Brown University to develop research facilities on former highway land.

When to listen:

RIPR FILE

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley is defending the football team after two of its players were charged with assault. The students allegedly got into a fight with a group of fraternity brothers, who were treated for injuries like broken noses. 

Day Donaldson / flickr

The Chair of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, is in Rhode Island today.  

She’s set to speak before some 750 people at the Providence Chamber of Commerce’s annual Economic Outlook Luncheon.

Yellen is the first woman in U.S. history to hold the top position at the Fed. Yellen has spent time in Rhode Island before; she graduated from Brown University with an economics degree in 1967.

Governor Gina Raimondo, Senator Jack Reed and University of Rhode Island President David Dooley are also set to speak at the lunch.

RIPR FILE

The University of Rhode Island is embarking on an ambitious plan to hire 55 new faculty members over the next four years to support the university’s core missions of teaching,  research and engagement.

URI President David Dooley said URI will invest about $5.3 million to establish these new positions. Money to support this investment in teaching and research will come from within the university’s operating budget.

RIPR FILE

Is Rhode Island government finally waking up to leveraging state colleges as wellsprings of economic development? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay sees some hopeful signs on Smith Hill.

After years of malign neglect of Rhode Island’s public colleges and universities, the General Assembly finally appears to be turning a corner. Several elements in the state budget approved last week by the House Finance Committee show that Statehouse politicians are finally getting the message on the iron link between education and creating jobs in the Ocean State.

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley ranks 158th in the country when it comes to his compensation package, according to a new survey from the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The last time the survey was published, Dooley ranked 134th in the country.

Dooley made $368,800 in 2013, according to the report, which looked at president's pay at 227 public universities around the country.

University of Rhode Island officials have announced they plan to arm campus police, despite vocal critics, who say the change will not make campus safer.

The university announced the decision after a year of public meetings and discussions with faculty, students and staff. In a statement, URI President David Dooley called the change critical.

"In order to provide the safest environment possible and to ensure a timely response to any threat to the safety of our campuses, our police officers must be equipped properly to function as first responders,” Dooley said.

URI

The University of Rhode Island kicks off football season Thursday night with an away-game against Fordham University. The game marks the start of the 115th season for the Rhode Island Rams, founded in 1895.

But the team has not been faring well recently. The Rams have not won a game since 2011 and start this season hoping to snap a 13-game losing streak.

Critics question whether the state’s flagship university should spend the money on a football program at all. URI President David Dooley has said he supports believes it is important to keep the program alive.

Michael Donnermeyer / Wiki Commons

State colleges and universities in Rhode Island can now arm campus police after a vote Thursday night at the State Board of Education.  Critics said more guns on campus will not make students safer, but supporters, including University of Rhode Island President David Dooley, said campus police should carry guns to do their jobs more effectively.

Dooley said he believes arming police is logical decision for URI.

There’s a meaty agenda on tap this week at the State Board of Education. The group is scheduled to vote Thursday on a controversial proposal to allow police to carry guns on state college campuses. The board is also scheduled to vote on adopting new science standards and consider a contract extension for Education Commissioner Deborah Gist.

The Chronicle of Higher Education finds University of Rhode Island President David Dooley is 134th in the country when it comes to his compensation package.

A preliminary review of the University of Rhode Island’s response to reports of a shooter on campus finds campus police were forced to wait five minutes before they could enter the building where the shooter was reportedly located. The officers, who are unarmed, had to wait for local police to arrive before they could enter the building.

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