don carcieri

UPDATE: Services for Judge Stone:

Calling hours, Wednesday October 4 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Perry-McStay Funeral Home in East Providence.

Memorial Service: Thursday October 5 at 6 p.m. at Sayles Hall at Brown University.

Burial: Friday October 6 at 11 a.m. at Rhode Island Veterans Cemetery, Exeter, RI.

Rhode Island Superior Court Judge Walter R. Stone of Bristol, a civil rights activist and one of Rhode Island’s top trial lawyers before his elevation to Superior Court, where he served as one of the very few African-American judges in the state, died today in a Newport hospice after a long illness. He was 73.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Why does the 38 Studios disaster still haunt Rhode Island’s political reputation? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has been thinking about the video game company since state police released more documents from the investigation.  


The state has reached a $16 million settlement with Hilltop Securities (formerly First Southwest), the last defendant in Rhode Island's lawsuit over 38 Studios.

If the deal wins court approval, there will not be a trial stemming from the state's lawsuit over the 2012 failure of the video game company -- and no testimony from key figures in what proved to be an expensive mistake for the state and its citizens.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Curt Schilling's comments on 38 Studios; ballot question 4, which would allocate $45 million in borrowing to modernize an engineering building at URI and create a so-called innovation campus; and what do about student debt.

First Southwest Company, one of the financial institutions involved in the ill-fated 38 Studios deal, is objecting to the state’s recent settlement agreement with two other banks in the ongoing lawsuit against actors in the video game fiasco.

Lawyers for First Southwest filed a memorandum in Rhode Island Superior Court objecting to the settlement with Barclays Capital and Wells Fargo Securities, which, if approved by the court, would yield just under $26 million in payments to the state.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After years of effort, Deepwater Wind expects to complete the first offshore wind farm in the US later this year. Supporters say the project off the coast of Block Island is an important milestone that will bolster the growth of renewable energy. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

  

The gloomy cloud of the 38 Studios debacle still hangs over Rhode Island. RIPR political analyst  Scott MacKay parses the latest General Assembly probe of the failed video game company.

CNN

  The criticism came fast and hard for former Rhode Island governor Lincoln Chafee’s presidential debate performance. Yet RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this shouldn’t tarnish his family’s political legacy or his reputation for truth-telling.

Hurricane Joaquin blows toward Rhode Island as the state remains vexed by its own ring of challenges: the hangover of 38 Studios, trying to modernize state agencies, financially troubled fire districts, you name it. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As always your tips and thoughts are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

There will be a day when Rhode Island moves beyond 38 Studios, but that day is a long time off. The public release Thursday of tens of thousands of pages of documents is just one more step toward trying to get a better understanding of Rhode Island's most recent scandal. So with that in mind, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me all week on the twitters. Here we go.

John Bender

Former Gov. Lincoln Chafee, now seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, weighed in this afternoon on the release of the 38 Studios court documents.

It was Chafee, a vigorous opponent of the 38 Studios deal when he was running for governor in 2010, who later hired lawyer Max Wistow to file suit against principals in the deal. 38 Studios went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers holding the bag for $75 million in state-backed bonds to the company run by former Boston Red Sox star pitcher Curt Schilling.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

During a closed session on June 9, 2010, the board of Rhode Island's Economic Development Corporation received a briefing on what then-Governor Don Carcieri suggested was a "fairly significant transaction" that had presented itself to the EDC.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo has decided to keep A.T. Wall, Rhode Island’s longtime corrections director, and the nation’s longest serving corrections head, in his post.

Wall has served as director of corrections since 2000. A graduate of Yale University and  Yale Law School, Wall is a native Rhode Islander who worked as a prosecutor in Manhattan after law school. He is known as erudite and thoughtful and is well-respected within the corrections community locally and nationally.

A Superior Court judge is scheduled Tuesday to consider the first settlement growing out of the state’s lawsuit over 38 Studios. The settlement calls for the state to get a payment of $4.3 million.

After 38 Studios went bankrupt in 2012, the state sued 14 defendants to try to cut down the roughly $90 million owed by taxpayers. The first proposed settlement in the case was announced late last month. It involves the law firm of Moses Afonso Ryan, which served as bond counsel for the ill-fated 38 Studios project.

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