Economic Development Corporation

RIPR

Governor Lincoln Chafee’s choice to lead the state Economic Development Corporation faces approval by the full state Senate committee Tuesday.  The votes comes amid debate over the EDC’s future.

Chafee’s choice, Marcel Valois, was unanimously approved by a Senate committee last week. Valois led the EDC in the 1990s during Lincoln Almond’s tenure as governor. He says Rhode Island needs to do a better job of helping business when it can and getting out of the way when it can’t.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Lincoln Chafee’s choice to lead the state Economic Development Corporation appears on a fast-track to approval, following his unanimous approval Tuesday by a state Senate committee.  Marcel Valois is calling for more support for small innovators and entrepreneurs.

Valois says Rhode Island’s business climate doesn’t have to remain the butt of bad ratings in national surveys. Invoking the state motto of “hope,” he says Rhode Island can prosper by bringing a sharper focus and new approach to economic development.

Gov. Lincoln Chafee’s choice to lead the state Economic Development Corporation faces approval by a state Senate committee Tuesday. The vote comes amid debate over whether to reorganize the EDC.

Chafee’s choice, Marcel Valois led the EDC back in the 1990’s during Lincoln Almond’s tenure as governor. Valois is the vice president of an economic foundation. He was previously chief operating officer of the Penske Automotive Group.

A state commission formed to preserve and expand defense-related businesses in Rhode Island holds its latest meeting Thursday.

The Defense Economy Planning Commission was created in 2010. The 25-member panel includes state legislators, as well as representatives of private businesses, the National Guard, chambers of commerce, and branches of state government.

The Sunday New York Times is out with Matt Bai's lengthy and well-written overview of Rhode Island's disastrous investment in 38 Studios, former Red Sox star Curt Schilling's bankrupt video game company. Bai's story doesn't offer much in the way of new findings, but it will expose the Ocean State's folly to a broad audience of influentials.

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