economic development

Governor Lincoln Chafee, perhaps responding to the clamor about the need for more short-term steps on boosting hte economy, has issued this news release:

How many Ken Block-style voters are out there?

That’s a big question, since Block says he plans to split his ticket on Tuesday, voting for President Obama and Republican CD1 candidate Brendan Doherty. If Doherty is going to prevail as Rhode Island’s great GOP hope, he needs tens of thousands of Rhode Islanders to do the same thing.

Block explained his stance during a taping of RIPR’s Bonus Q+A, which will air Friday at 6:40 and 8:40 am:

With a series of organizations calling for more urgency in jolting Rhode Island’s under-performing economy, Governor Lincoln Chafee says the state needs to remain focused on a long-term approach. 

Speaking during a news conference highlighting $110 million in federally-backed improvements at T.F. Green Airport, Chafee said:

We offered highlights this morning from the new Brown poll. Here’s some additional analysis:

John Simmons (left), executive director of the Rhode Island Public Expenditure Council (RIPEC), formally presented this morning a 136-page report on remaking Rhode Island’s approach to economic development.

You can’t make this stuff up.

Summer Camp Studios, co-founded by Rich Gallup (formerly of 38 Studios), has released a video game that centers on farting felines.

PockerGamer reports:

Keith Stokes, who lost his job at the state Economic Development Corporation in the aftermath of the meltdown at 38 Studios, started a new gig yesterday: president of strategic economic planning & development at the Mayforth Group.

Maybe it’s just a coincidence, but we’re seeing a few attempts to bring some urgency to Rhode Island and its perennial economic struggles.

Even with what often seems like a tepid recovery, the United States is working its way back toward a muscular economy — if you believe the Economist.

The sharp-eyed British newsmagazine points to a number of factors: under-valued homes, increasing exports, the growing “app economy,” and more. So if the nation can do it, what about the perennial sick man of the New England states?