economy

RIPR FILE

The state department of labor put out its monthly jobs report Thursday. The numbers show mixed news for the state.

Once burdened with one of the highest unemployment rates in the country, Rhode Island’s most recent rate stood at 5.4 percent, for the sixth consecutive month. 

That’s down about a point from the same time last year, but still more than a point higher than the national average.

The number of jobs in the state dropped by two-thousand between April and May. 

Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon hosts our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. Co-Host Mark Murphy, editor of Providence Business News, will return next week.

This week, Dave hears about the impact of parking meters on Thayer Street, the major commercial strip near Brown University. A leading critic of the meters, Ken Dulgarian, owner of the Avon Cinema and other properties, says they are devastating local businesses.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

RIPR File Photo

Immigration consistently ranks as the number one issue in national surveys of Latino voters, such as surveys by Latino Decisions and Univision News. But education and the economy are not far behind. As part of our RhodyVotes '16 coverage, we talked to some Latino voters about what's driving them to the polls. 

Happy March Madness, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

John Bender / RIPR

As part of our occasional series, Rising Tide, we’re offering snapshots of Rhode Island’s economy after the Great Recession. The state famous for coffee milk syrup, is now home to a burgeoning specialty coffee scene.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave chat about PBN's winter survey of local businesses. Chalk it up to a shaky global economy or rising health care costs, businesses are feeling queasy about their local prospects.

 

When to listen: 
You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week, they’re joined by Cheryl Snead, the CEO and founder of Bannecker Industries of North Smithfield. Snead is also chair of the Women’s Enterprise Forum, which advises non-profit which works to foster and certify women-owned businesses around the country. The topic is growing opportunities for women to own their own business.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A new bill that puts a tax on carbon has garnered broad support from environmental advocates, businesses, and religious groups. Supporters believe the bill, called Energize Rhode Island, will help reduce carbon emissions and stimulate the economy. 

Ian Donnis

During a lunchtime conversation with reporters Tuesday, Governor Gina Raimondo offered fresh details on the state's pursuit of General Electric, touted what she cited as a positive series of steps on economic development, and called on Rhode Islanders to be more receptive to different ways of pursuing government initiatives.

Winter is here in earnest, with weekend snow, and the political beat is revving at full throttle. Thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and feedback are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave talk with Dr. Sylvia Maxfield, dean of the School of Business at Providence College, about the new Brookings Institution report on how to improve Rhode Island's economy.  

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50pm.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you. news@ripr.org      

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Due to the possibility of a major snow storm this weekend, Governor Gina Raimondo canceled her plan to leave Wednesday night for the annual World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

The governor said keeping Rhode Islanders safe is her top priority. Spokeswoman Marie Aberger said the decision to scrap the trip was made with "imperfect [weather]information," four days ahead of the storm's expected impact.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A new report requested by the Raimondo administration says Rhode Island can overcome its economic listlessness by using a focused strategy to make targeted investments in key sectors for job growth.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo plans to attend the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, next week as part of her effort to promote Rhode Island while attempting to attract new jobs.

"The governor will participate in a range of policy discussions and meetings with several leading domestic and international business executives to promote Rhode Island as a place fostering innovation and economic opportunity," spokeswoman Marie Aberger said in a statement Wednesday. "The governor will be traveling from January 20-23."

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Richard Culatta started on the job this week as Rhode Island's first chief innovation officer. The job represents a homecoming for the 37-year-old South Kingstown native after he most recently worked in senior jobs in the US Department of Education.

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