education

Rhode Island Foundation

Two Rhode Island women, Ditra Edwards and Donna Childs, are the recipients of $300,000 in grants from the Rhode Island Foundation to help improve civic engagement.

National Education Association RI executive director Robert Walsh joins Bonus Q&A to discuss public education and charter schools, the challenges facing national Democrats, and much more.

courtesy of URI

The House Finance Committee is set to hear testimony on Governor Gina Raimondo's free college tuition plan Wednesday.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr/ Creative Commons License

Rhode Island’s congressional delegation expressed skepticism after President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress, Tuesday.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The heads of three Rhode Island universities join a growing list of leaders at higher learning institutions opposing President Trump’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

A coalition of six mayors of Rhode Island cities and towns have announced support for Gov. Gina Raimondo’s plan to guarantee two years of tuition-free college at the state’s public higher education institutions.

The mayors are Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza, Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien, Warwick Mayor Scott Avedisian, Cumberland Mayor William Murray, Central Falls Mayor James Diossa,  and Johnston Mayor Joe Polisena.

Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo makes a stop at Johnston High School Tuesday to promote her initiative for free college tuition. The governor has proposed two years of free in-state tuition for Rhode Islanders on track to graduate at a community college or state university.

Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo’s plan for two years of free college tuition is grabbing most of the attention in the budget proposal for fiscal year 2018, but there’s also new funding for K-12 schools. Here are some highlights.

The governor has proposed at total of $2.6 billion for K-12 and higher education.

SHERYL RICH-KERN

For college students, the academic year is well underway. Students have spent the first semester making new friends and adjusting to classes and dorm life.

But unlike previous generations, these young adults are more likely to report anxiety and depression.

And that has campus mental health centers struggling to keep up with demand.

At Keene State College in New Hampshire, English major Aidan Bolduc sits near a window in the atrium, as other students banter over summer escapades and coursework.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The State Council on Elementary and Post-Secondary Education voted Tuesday to allow a major proposed expansion of the charter school system, Achievement First, in Providence. The Connecticut-based organization could potentially grow by more than 2,000 students.

Achievement First currently operates two elementary schools in the capital city, with about 700 students. The group is hoping to expand that to three elementary schools, two middle schools, and a high school, increasing enrollment to more than 3,000.

RIPR FILE

Debate is growing over the expansion of the charter school Achievement First in Providence. 

A new study from the Chronicle of Higher Education finds the highest paid private college president in Rhode Island is Richard Gouse, head of the New England Institute of Technology.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island Education Commissioner Ken Wagner is backing a plan to add 2,192 seats to the charter for Achievement First, a mayoral academy that currently operates two elementary schools in Providence. 

Hundreds of teachers and school leaders are expected in Providence Thursday for the Coalition of Essential Schools Fall Forum. The group was founded by former Brown University Education Chair Ted Sizer, who advocated for giving schools freedom to design their own programs.

RIPR FILE

Students around the College Hill neighborhood of Providence expressed dismay over the election of Donald Trump as the country’s 45th president. Brown University students held “self-care” gatherings on the campus green. Rhode Island School of Design faculty told students to take the Wednesday off if they wanted.

Brown student, Katherine Duckworth voted for Hillary Clinton, and said she can’t talk about the results and not cry.

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