elizabeth burke bryant

RIPR FILE

Just two decades ago, the vast majority of Rhode Island children had elevated levels of lead in their blood when they were tested at the start of Kindergarten. Today, the percentage has dropped into the single digits, according to Rhode Island Kids Count Executive Director Elizabeth Burke Bryant, whose organization started tracking blood lead statistics in the mid-1990s.

RIPR FILE

Children are becoming more diverse in Rhode Island, but the number of babies born in withdrawal from opioids continues to grow. Those are just some of the statistics in this year’s Kids Count fact book, which comes out Monday. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke with Rhode Island Kids Count Executive Director Elizabeth Burke Bryant about several of the highlights in the report.  

Rhode Island Kids Count

Kids Count is out with its annual report on the health, education and safety of children in Rhode Island.

The report shows there are close to a quarter million children in the state. Nineteen percent live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.

The good news, says Kids Count director Elizabeth Burke Bryant, is that they’re healthier than they once were.

Kids Count is out with its annual report on the health, education and safety of children in Rhode Island.

The report shows there are close to a quarter million children in the state. Nineteen percent live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.

The good news, says Kids Count director Elizabeth Burke Bryant, is that they’re healthier than they once were.