Energy Facility Siting Board

Steve Szydlowski / The Providence Journal

Rhode Island’s Energy Facility Siting Board decided Tuesday morning during a hearing to exclude from evidence resolutions from 35 cities and towns opposing a proposed natural gas power plant in Burrillville.


Avory Brookins / RIPR

The Town of Burrillville is preparing to testify at evidentiary hearings later this month against Invenergy, developers of a proposed natural gas power plant.

Tim Faulkner / ecoRI News

Invenergy, the company that wants to build a controversial, natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville, is pushing back the plant's start date by at least a year. 


Avory Brookins / RIPR

A final decision on a controversial proposed power plant in the Town of Burrillville is expected to stretch into next year. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Here’s a rundown of what’s happening this week with the proposed Burrillville power plant:

Public comment hearing

The Energy Facility Siting Board holds a hearing Wednesday evening for public comment on the proposed power plant in Burrillville. The hearing will take place at Warwick's Toll Gate High School auditorium at 6 p.m.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Lawmakers in the Rhode Island House of Representatives easily approved legislation related to the state’s Energy Facility Siting Board and to tax treaties with electricity-generating facilities in Burrillville. But some lawmakers in the state Senate were not as receptive to the bill.

The environmental advocacy nonprofit the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) has taken a new step this week to block the proposal for a new natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville. CLF is asking the state Energy Facility Siting Board, which is responsible for reviewing the power plant permit application, to send back the application to developer Invenergy because it’s incomplete. Rhode Island Public Radio Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza joined All Things Considered News Anchor Dave Fallon in the studio to share details. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Burrillville has become the unlikely epicenter for controversy over natural gas. The town is home to a natural gas-fired power plant, two pipelines, and two compressor stations to push gas through the pipelines.