environment

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

  Honey bees have been having a tough time lately. Pests and disease have plagued many hives, killing off the pollinators and forcing people looking to save the bees to get creative.

How To Feed The World, Sustainably

Jun 12, 2017

Stephen Porder is Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University. He talked with Laxmi Parthasarathy for a special RIPR interview about sustainability. Prof. Porder's research includes the effects of fertilizer on the environment and how those effects differ between North American farms and farms carved out of the Amazon.

RIPR FILE

President Donald Trump’s executive orders on energy could have big impacts on states producing fossil fuels. But the order could still affect the Ocean State’s goals to reduce greenhouse gases.

Rhode Island has set the ambitious goal to reduce carbon emissions in the state 45 percent below the state’s emissions levels of 1990. Rhode Island will likely maintain that goal no matter what comes out of the White House.

CREATIVE COMMONS

 As natural gas gets diverted for home and other heating this winter, the head of New England's electricity grid is warning about possible future risks to the region's power.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Virtually all Rhode Islanders have at least a loose connection to the town of Johnston. Almost all of your junk -- trash, dried out Christmas trees, even used paint -- winds up at the Johnston Landfill.  Those items are all sorted and processed in different parts of the sprawling complex.

The Environment Council of Rhode Island has laid out its legislative priorities for the new General Assembly session. The group, comprised mostly of local non-profit environmental groups, hopes to cut carbon emissions with a new tax and increase renewable energy efforts.

The Council proposed a new tax that would be levied on companies bringing carbon-based fuels into the state. A tax rate of $15 per ton of potential carbon emissions would go to fund state renewable energy efforts.

Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

New research from the University of New Hampshire suggests some bat species have developed a resistance to a devastating fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome.

Since the white-nose syndrome was introduced to North America from Europe about 10 years ago, it has killed roughly 90 percent of the little brown bat population in the northeast.

RIPR File Photo

It’s been a big week for wind energy. The nation’s first offshore wind farm is up and running off the coast of Block Island. And another Rhode Island wind company just scored a grant from the National Science FoundationAquanis is a tech company trying to improve the efficiency of wind turbines. We introduce you to the wind energy company you may not know about.

Sen. Whitehouse Slams Trump's EPA Pick

Dec 7, 2016
Courtesy Sheldon Whitehouse office

President-elect Donald Trump has nominated Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to serve as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Co-Chair of the U.S. Senate Climate Action Task Force  Senator Sheldon Whitehouse says he’s disheartened by the choice. He says Pruitt denies the reality of climate change. And the attorney general was among those who sued the EPA over its Clean Power Plan to mitigate climate change.

Janet Graham / Creative Commons License

The invasive moths are native to Europe and first appeared in New England around 2004. The females lay their eggs between Thanksgiving and the New Year, and their offspring can cause extensive damage to foliage when they hatch as caterpillars in the spring.

Heather Faubert, a research associate at the University of Rhode Island, said so far there’s only one real way to deal with winter months.  

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The environmental nonprofit presented awards to distinguished naturalists in the Rhode Island Saturday. It’s how the nonprofit is wrapping its celebration of Natural History Week, says Executive Director David Gregg.

Gregg said Rhode Island will begin to see things in nature that we’ve never seen before.

“In order what they mean and what their implications are, we have to go out there and look at stuff,” said Gregg. “We can’t assume that things in the past are going to be the same in the future.”

Nancy Eve Cohen / WFCR

Some Housatonic River advocates say they wish the EPA’s cleanup plan called for digging up more PCBs. PCBs are a man-made toxin, which was manufactured in the 1920s. This comes as the agency released its final plan to remove toxins from the river which runs through western Massachusetts and Connecticut. The $613 million plan calls for removing and capping PCBs from the river bottom and floodplain.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island’s tool for managing and planning activities in state waters has become a case study for the European Union. A couple of EU delegates have concluded a two-week visit to Rhode Island, meeting with the Coastal Resources Management Council, the University of Rhode Island, and other stakeholders in the community and in private sectors.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The White House is honoring a Rhode Island fisherman Friday for his work promoting sustainable fishing in the industry.

Chris Brown has been fishing for more than 35 years. He’s receiving the “Champion of Change for Sustainable Seafood” award. 

Environmental Working Group

The carcinogen often referred to as the "Erin Brockovich chemical" is present in about two-thirds of the drinking water across the country, according to water testing data from the Environmental Protection Agency.

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