Whitehouse Office

The U.S. Senate passed a bill approving construction of the Keystone XL pipeline Thursday.  Rhode Island’s junior Senator Sheldon Whitehouse voted against the bill.

A vocal critic from the start, Whitehouse released a sharp statement following the bill’s passage.  He calls the $8 billion dollar project a “disaster” for health and the environment.   The Keystone project would construct a nearly 12-hundred mile pipeline to carry mainly oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast.

Whitehouse says the project would encourage dependence of fossil fuels, which exacerbate climate change.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo plans to re-appoint Janet Coit as the director of the state Department of Environmental Management.

“During the past four years, Director Coit proved to be not only a strong advocate for the environment, but a skilled manager of a complex department,” Raimondo said in a statement. “I admire her passion for conserving our natural resources and am thrilled to have her continue her good work as a member of my cabinet.”

Coit's re-appointment is subject to confirmation by the state Senate.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark talk with Grow Smart Rhode Island executive director Scott Wolf. They discuss the bond measures passed on Election Day and the kinds of jobs they will create once the dollars start flowing.

When to Listen

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50pm.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

On Tuesday, voters will not only vote on candidates running for public office, they will also vote on a series of bond issues--two of them related to the environment. As part of our Rhody Votes ’14 coverage, environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza joined Rhode Island Public Radio Morning Edition Host Elisabeth Harrison to talk about them.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you: news@ripr.org

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island's high unemployment rate is at the top of many voters’ minds this election season. This year’s gubernatorial candidates have offered different ways to create jobs. But the Ocean State’s next governor will also need to tackle a wide range of environmental issues. As part of our Rhody Votes ’14 coverage, Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza explores what those issues are.