ethics

State Representative Anthony Giarrusso (R-East Greenwich) joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss the merits of reform attempts in the House; what the state can do to help small business; how Republicans can increase their legislative ranks; and more.

Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Lots of pots cooking, so we'll keep the formalities short. Your tips and comments are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me 24/7 on the twitters. Here we go.

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello joins Bonus Q+A to discuss the PawSox' proposal for a Providence stadium; state efforts to curb Medicaid spending; the state of ethics reform at the Statehouse; and much more.

You can hear more of our conversation with Speaker Mattiello on Political Roundtable.

Expect the unexpected in Rhode Island politics, right? Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome (idonnis at ripr dot org), and feel free to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Common Cause of Rhode Island executive director John Marion joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the fight for reform after guilty pleas last week by former House speaker Gordon Fox; Governor Gina Raimondo's first budget; and Ken Block's study on the cost of fire services in RI.

RIPR FILE

Woonsocket Mayor Lisa Baldelli-Hunt has agreed to pay a $750 state ethics fine over the creation of a summer jobs program that hired her teenage son.

``I accept the findings of the Ethics Commission and respect their decision. I had previously paid in full all the wages he earned in the amount of $880. I also accept the fine of $750 and I believe this matter should be put behind me,’’ the mayor said in a statement released by her office.

Talk about a full Rhode Island. Gordon Fox pleads guilty, Gerry Martineau wants his legislative pension, the state Supreme Court green-lights an April start for the pension trial, and Governor Gina Raimondo is set to unveil her first budget on Thursday. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

RIPR FILE

Channel 12 reports the Providence Board of Licenses believes there’s not enough concrete evidence to revoke a liquor license for a bar that’s been implicated in a corruption probe. But Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza said he’s still looking into the matter.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Teresa Paiva Weed of Newport is poised to be elected next month to her fourth term as president of the Rhode Island Senate. Paiva Weed recently sat down in her Statehouse office to talk about her priorities for 2015 and other issues.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

Democratic Providence mayoral candidate Jorge Elorza outlined a plan in front of City Hall Thursday for tightening ethics oversight in the city his first 100 days in office.

Elorza’s plan includes impaneling an ethics commission that now exists only on paper, training for department heads, making city government more transparent, and refusing campaign contributions from city employees as both a candidate and mayor.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

That depends on your priorities. But first, here's what's at issue:

Back in 2007, Gordon Fox said he didn't think his public office had been beneficial to his private law practice. The statement has some unintentional irony in the present, considering how Fox faces a state Ethics Commission investigation for not disclosing legal work done from 2005 to 2009 for the Providence Economic Development Partnership.

Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Bonus Q+A to discuss the legislative process; funding bridge maintenance; her future political plans; and much more.

Common Cause of RI executive director John Marion joins us on Bonus Q+A to discuss the General Assembly, selecting judges in Rhode Island, the evolving world of campaign finance, the 2014 vote on a constitutional convention, and other topics.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Some of the toughest decisions any of us will ever make will take place in a doctor’s office. But before those decisions ever come up, doctors must often wrestle with the options themselves. And those options are growing more complicated every year. In this next to last episode in our series Future Docs, we ask how today’s medical students are learning to grapple with tomorrow’s ethical questions.

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