foster care

RIPR

Two private foundations announced Thursday donations totaling $95,000 to support Rhode Island’s efforts to expand the state’s foster care system.

RIPR File Photo

Foster children age out of the system in Rhode Island as soon as they turn 18. But advocates say that’s too young. Those advocates are pushing state lawmakers to extend foster care.

A decade ago young people were allowed to stay under the care of the state until age 21. But in 2007 the state reduced the age to 18.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Dec. 6

Dec 6, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Dec. 6:

THUNDERMIST CEO: Thundermist Health Center President and CEO Chuck Jones is stepping down in February. Jones joined Thundermist in 2008. He moves on to be CEO of Harbor Health Services in Dorchester, MA. Thundermist will conduct a nationwide search for his replacement.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State lawmakers continue their oversight of the state's child welfare agency.  At a hearing Tuesday night, Department of Children, Youth, and Families director Jamia McDonald said her organization has made progress. 

DCYF Chief Stepping Down; National Search Begins

Sep 9, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The acting head of the Rhode Island’s Department of Children, Youth, and Families is leaving her post. She’s the third Health and Human Services agency leader to step down in less than a few months.

Ian Donnis

Gov. Gina Raimondo is expected to sign a series of bills Wednesday that impact schools and children, including a bill requiring 20 minutes of recess per day in elementary schools.

Also on the list, a bill requiring public reporting on the deaths of children in the foster care system, dyslexia screenings in elementary schools, and a bill that authorizes the creation of a "bi-literacy" seal for bilingual high school graduates.

The Pulse: What Progress For Foster Kids?

May 12, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s child welfare system has been struggling to keep kids out of group homes, find enough foster families, and even deal with a legacy of financial irregularities. Earlier this year, Governor Gina Raimondo called for an overhaul of the agency. And for this week’s The Pulse, we check in with the person Raimondo put in charge of that overhaul: Jamia McDonald to find out what progress has been made.

Kristin Gourlay

Child welfare officials say they are already working to correct several problems highlighted in a report from the Office of the Child Advocate, which found two infants' deaths could have been prevented. The report looked at the deaths of three infants, two in state care and one whose parents had prior contact with the child welfare system.

The findings raised questions about safety for foster children, particularly children placed with relatives in unlicensed foster homes. 

RIPR file photo

Rhode Island’s Office of the Child Advocate has released a disturbing report about the deaths of three infants, two of them in state care. The report found that at least two of the children’s deaths could have been prevented, and it points to serious concerns about safety for children in state care.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island doesn’t have enough foster families to meet a growing need. That’s one reason the Department of Children, Youth, and Families places a higher percentage of kids in group homes than almost any other state. DCYF officials acknowledge the problem. But recruiting new foster families has been tough.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Children who experience abuse or neglect–or even the stress of poverty—can have serious health problems later in life. That’s one of many challenges for children in Rhode Island’s child welfare system. We continue our series “Children in Crisis” with this look at how some health care professionals hope to address those challenges. 

Portrait Exhibit Features Children Waiting For Adoption

Apr 22, 2015
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Hundreds of children are awaiting adoption in Rhode Island. Now some of their portraits are on display at an exhibit in Providence City Hall.

16 portraits of smiling Rhode Island children between the ages of eight and 19 are hanging now in the city’s tax collection office. It’s not exactly what you’d expect to find when you go to pay your bill.  But Adoption Rhode Island head Darlene Allen says she hopes the portraits will raise awareness about the need for more adoptive families.