Gina Raimondo

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss competing plans to cut the car tax; her proposal to offer Rhode Islanders two years of free tuition at state colleges; and a spate of charges against former state lawmakers.

John Bender / RIPR

Gov. Gina Raimondo's position statement came as a welcome surprise to dozens of protestors gathered at the Statehouse Wednesday.

Residents and lawmakers had crammed into the Statehouse rotunda to protest federal plans to move rail infrastructure in parts of Charlestown and Westerly. Then, Charlestown Town Councilor Virginia Lee told the crowd the governor agreed with them.

Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo makes a stop at Johnston High School Tuesday to promote her initiative for free college tuition. The governor has proposed two years of free in-state tuition for Rhode Islanders on track to graduate at a community college or state university.

Barbara Quill

Thousands of women, men and families rallied on the south lawn of the Rhode Island State House Saturday in a show of support for the Women's March on Washington. 

Elisabeth Harrison

Maybe all you have to know about Gov. Gina Raimondo’s free tuition plan is this: Americans with no more than a high school education have now fallen so far behind in salaries that the earnings chasm has reached its widest point on record.

Just another quiet Friday in America, right? Thanks for stopping by as we hurtle into a new area, with lots to watch on the local and national level. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Health and Human Services make up a little more than 40 percent of Governor Gina Raimondo’s proposed 2018 budget. There are no huge surprises in this year’s recommendations, but much uncertainty over the fate of federal health care funding.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo on Thursday presented to the General Assembly a $9.2 billion budget that cuts car tax assessments by 30 percent; offers Rhode Islanders two free years of college tuition; raises the minimum wage to $10.50 an hour, effective in July; and hikes the cigarette tax 50 cents, to $4.25 a pack.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Students at Rhode Island College reacted to Governor Gina Raimondo’s free tuition plan this week. The governor’s higher education proposal would cover the cost of tuition for in-state students for the first two years at the Community College of Rhode Island, or the last two years at the University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College.

Aaron Read / RIPR

In response to Governor Gina Raimondo’s State of the State speech on Tuesday, Rhode Island members of the National Federation of Independent Business have penned a statement expressing frustration.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, Governor Gina Raimondo's Republican rival from 2014, expressed concern Wednesday about the governor's proposal to give Rhode Islanders two years of free tuition at state institutions of higher learning.

On a day when Raimondo staged a rally at Cranston East High School in support of her plan, Fung responded with a statement.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

With her term as governor half-way over, Gina Raimondo used her latest State of the State address to assert she's steering Rhode Island in the right direction and to tout a series of initiatives that could bolster her support among middle-class voters.

RIPR FILE

Governor Gina Raimondo delivers her State of the State speech tonight at the Statehouse. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Since the launch of the Rhode Island’s trouble social services system, UHIP, many nursing homes have gone without payment for Medicaid patients. Owed for months of care, many administrators are concerned they won’t be able to go without payment for much longer.

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