Gordon Fox

There are some glimmers of positive economic news as Rhode Island races toward the New Year. So thanks for stopping for my weekly column. Feel free to share your tips and thoughts at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

When Rhode Islanders head to polls next week, they will face an important issue that has not drawn much attention. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay looks at the Constitutional Convention question.

Our small state is holding a big election on Nov. 4. Statewide and federal offices are all being contested. Every General Assembly member confronts voters, who will also elect mayors in the Rhode Island’s two largest cities, Providence and Warwick.

The Farmers Market at Lippitt Park on Providence’s East Side is a bustling venue on Saturday mornings as people line up to choose from a cornucopia of fruits, vegetables, sweets, seafood and pasture-feed beef. It was also a beehive of political activity this morning as candidates milled among prospective voters. Secretary of State Ralph Mollis, who is running in the Democratic primary for lieutenant governor was spotted, along with Buddy Cianci, who is trying to make a comeback for Providence mayor as an independent.

While pols and pundits lament the lack of competition in R.I. House elections across Rhode Island – almost half of all lawmakers are unopposed – that isn’t the case on Providence’s East Side House District 4.

The seat opened up after the incumbent, former House Speaker Gordon Fox, stepped away after his capitol office and home were raided by state and federal agents in March. Fox hasn’t been charged with any crimes yet, but he wisely decided against running again.

Three well-qualified Democrats are vying for their party’s nomination in the September 9 primary.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Democratic secretary of state candidate Guillaume de Ramel's decision to hire Gordon Fox as a lawyer in 2011 has emerged as an issue in the Democratic primary race between de Ramel and Nellie Gorbea.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello on Tuesday told state reps that the law firm representing Adler Pollock & Sheehan "has withdrawn the subpoenas it was preparing for members of the General Assembly to offer deposition testimony in the civil litigation involving the Job Creation Guarantee Program of 2010."

The latest development comes after at least two current state representatives were contacted regarding subpoenas in the state's lawsuit over the failure of 38 Studios.

The mother of former House Speaker Gordon Fox, D-Providence, died this morning. Mary Fox, who lived with her son at his East Side home for many years, was 92.

A domestic worker, Mary Fox was known for her devotion to family and her good nature. She lived with her son until just a few weeks ago, when she went to a nursing home facility. Funeral service plans have not been completed, according to House spokesman Larry Berman.

Democratic secretary of state candidate Guillaume de Ramel joins Political Roundtable to discuss his campaign; disclosure shortcomings involving lobbyists; the Democratic race for governor; and other issues.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello is applauding plans by state police to speak with lawmakers about a 2010 vote that set the stage for 38 Studios to come to Rhode Island. A Job Creation Guaranty Program approved by the legislature was later used to channel $75 million to the ill-fated video game company.

A Superior Court judge has declined to quash a subpoena calling for former House speaker Gordon Fox to answer questions related to the state’s lawsuit over 38 Studios.

The ruling by Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein means that Fox must attend a deposition conducted by one of the 14 defendants being sued by the state over 38 Studios.

RIPR FILE

What’s worse than the 38 Studios fiasco for Rhode Island ‘s political and economic reputation? RIPR political analyst  Scott MacKay points to the aftermath.

It’s been nearly four years since  then- Gov. Donald Carcieri, the state Economic Development Corporation and the General Assembly foisted the disaster that is 38 Studios on Rhode Island taxpayers.

Former Rhode Island House Speaker Gordon Fox of Providence has put his Providence home on the market.

Fox, who resigned as speaker after state police and FBI and IRS agents raided his State House office and his East Side home on March 21, is asking  $615,00 for his house on Gorton Street on the East Side of the city.

Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and my short missives can be found on the twitters. Let's head right in:

RIPR FILE

There’s another development in the case that led to former House Speaker Gordon Fox’s resignation last month.  Federal law enforcement officials on Wednesday subpoenaed City of Providence records related to Fox.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The investigators who raided former House Speaker Gordon Fox's Statehouse office and East Side home on March 21 appear to be examining Fox's campaign fundraising.

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