hasbro children's hospital


As the debate about receiving more Syrian refugees continues, a Hasbro Children’s Hospital doctor worries about refugees who have already made the journey to Rhode Island.

Dr. Carol Lewis runs the health clinic for refugee children at Hasbro. She says she worries about how the escalating back-and-forth about accepting refugees will affect her teenage patients in particular.

“They’re hearing this stuff on the news. And how must that make them feel? When you hear these terribly un-welcoming comments about refugees," said Lewis.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A $12.5 million dollar donation from toy maker Hasbro’s founding family will help launch a new institute at Brown University to study children’s health. The collaboration with local hospitals will focus on new approaches to kids’ most urgent health problems.

The early focus of the new institute will be to dig deeper into the drivers behind asthma, autism, and obesity. Hasbro Children’s Hospital pediatrician-in-chief Dr. Phyllis Dennery will help lead the effort.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The union representing Rhode Island Hospital nurses and other medical professionals has rejected the latest contract proposal from the Lifespan hospital network, owner of the hospital.

``Our focus now is to continue fighting for a fair and reasonable agreement that represents the sacrifice and commitment that front-line caregivers bring to their job every day,’’ said Helene Macedo, president of the United Nurses and Allied Professionals Local 5808.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

If you’ve walked through the front doors of a hospital lately, you might remember the friendly volunteer who greeted you, or gave you directions. Volunteers have been a mainstay in health care settings for years. But they’ve become an increasingly critical resource as health care dollars are spread thin.

Here are a few asthma resources in the community to help you or a loved one manage your asthma. Did you know you can attend classes to learn more about managing your or your child's asthma, arrange a home visit to help reduce triggers where you live, and more - often for free?


The U.S. outlawed lead paint in 1978. Yet it still covers the walls of many older homes, particularly here in the northeast. When that paint chips or peels, it poses a serious danger especially to kids. But in 2005, Rhode Island passed a law requiring some landlords to clean up lead paint. And a group of researchers recently set out to find out if it’s working. Hasbro Children’s Hospital pediatrician and Brown University school of public health associate professor doctor Patrick Vivier is one of those researchers.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) Rhode Island’s hospital emergency rooms are coping with an unusually high surge of patients suffering from the flu. But what’s driving that increase?

Most people who catch this season’s flu will spend several uncomfortable days shivering in bed. But those who get hit particularly hard can end up in the hospital, needing fluids or suffering from a high fever. And right now, says Dr. Brian Zink, head of emergency medicine for Rhode Island and The Miriam Hospitals, those hit hard by the flu are making for very busy emergency rooms. The reason? The season.