healthcare

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Joining forces with U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse is the latest lawmaker to announce plans to co-sponsor legislation to create a single-payer health system.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse is raising alarms about a proposed sale of Care New England -- Rhode Island’s second-largest hospital group to a large out-of-state hospital chain.

Lifespan, Rhode Island’s largest hospital system, is reporting strong operating earnings as rival Care New England continues to lose money.

The President of Women and Infants Hospital in Providence is leaving. Hospital head Mark Marcantano will step down Friday.

Women and Infants' parent organization, Care New England, made an announcement to staff via memo Thursday. Marcantano has been president of the hospital since 2014. He served as acting head before that.

RIPR FILE

The Providence-based hospital organization Care New England has signed a letter of intent to merge with the Boston-based organization Partners HealthCare, Care NE announced Wednesday.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s broken about Rhode Island’s mental health system and what would it take to fix the problems? 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark are joined by former Blue Cross-Blue Shield of RI President and CEO James Purcell.

The three discuss the Trump Administration and the future of the Affordable Care Act. The also talk about Trump cabinet pick Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services, and possible changes in Medicaid.

When to listen:

President Obama
Colin Marshall NPR

On Tuesday January 10th at 9pm ET, RIPR will be providing live, special coverage of President Obama's "farewell address" in Chicago.

The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating the speech; they'll be adding fact-checks and background to Obama's comments as he gives them. We'll be watching in particular for remarks on his legacy, national security, health care and foreign policy, among other topics.

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Patrick Quinn, executive vice president of SEIU Healthcare1199NE, joins Bonus Q&A this week to discuss healthcare policy, the labor movement, and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss changes in Rhode Island's healthcare landscape, how lawmakers will address the proposed legalization of marijuana, and the outlook on improving public education.

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Rhode Island is now one of just nine states and the District of Columbia offering coverage for transgender medical services under Medicaid. The new policy went public this week.

Previously, Medicaid in Rhode Island offered no coverage for patients seeking hormone therapy or gender reassignment surgery. Now, those patients can get those services and mental health treatment too.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The United Nurses and Allied Professionals Union has reached a new contract deal. The three-year labor agreement with Rhode Island Hospital affects some 2000 union nurses and technicians.

As School Sports Gear Up, So Does Risk Of Concussion

Sep 3, 2015
Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

 

As school gets underway across Rhode Island, thousands of kids will sign up to play sports. And with that comes the risk of concussion. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Ted Almon, president and CEO of The Claflin Company, a distributor of medical and surgical products. Almond is also a member of Governor Gina Raimondo's working group tasked with finding ways to reduce healthcare spending.

Rhode Island’s largest health care network will close six group homes by the end of August. Lifespan affiliate, Gateway Healthcare, blames reimbursement rates for the closures.

The closures will affect dozens of adults with substance abuse or mental health diagnoses, and a little more than a dozen kids in state care. They range in age from five to 18. Gateway says Medicaid doesn’t pay enough to cover the cost of their care. Executive office of health and human services secretary Elizabeth Roberts acknowledges that’s a challenge.

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