HealthSourceRI

RIPR

Rhode Islanders enrolled in health coverage through the Affordable Care Act can now pay their monthly insurance bills at their local CVS Pharmacy.

HealthSourceRI

State officials reported Monday that Rhode Island’s enrollments in insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act rose 5 percent, despite cuts in federal subsidies for the coverage.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Inside a conference center in Cranston, Robert Collington tried to find out what he’ll have to pay for his health plan come January. He’d come to the state’s open enrollment fair to meet with a health insurance navigator, who was helping him sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

RIPR file photo

Rhode Island’s health insurance commissioner has approved premium hikes of 18- to 20-percent next year on the most popular plans sold through the state marketplace, HealthSource RI.

The Pulse: Sherman On The Future Of HealthSource RI

Feb 16, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Online health insurance marketplaces like Rhode Island’s HealthSource RI are a key feature of the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders buy health insurance plans through the exchange, and most receive some kind of federal subsidy to help pay for those plans. But Obamacare is under fire, and there’s a lot of uncertainty about these marketplaces. 


Aaron Read

Just 5 percent of Rhode Islanders now lack health insurance and the uninsured rate has dropped by more than half since 2012, according to data released today by HealthSourceRI, the state’s Obamacare health exchange.

The rate of Rhode Islanders who lack health insurance has declined from 11 percent in 2012 to 5 percent now.

Anya Rader Wallack, HealthSource director, said the numbers show the Affordable Care Act is working best in states, like Rhode Island, that have expanded Medicaid and run state-based health exchanges, rather than relying on the federal program.

HealthSourceRI

Months into her tenure as head of HealthSource RI, Anya Rader Wallack is still trying to undo a tangle of customer service problems.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo is expected to replace Christine Ferguson as the leader of HealthSourceRI, Rhode Island's version of Obamacare, RIPR has learned.

The leading candidate to replace Ferguson is Anya Rader Wallack, the president of Arrowhead Health Analytics in Fall River, Massachusetts, and a former policy director and deputy chief of staff for former Vermont governor Howard Dean. Rader Wallack declined comment when contacted by RIPR.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo joins Bonus Q+A to talk about the ongoing state pension dispute, HealthSourceRI, CVS' decision to develop a new technology center in Boston, the Rhode Map controversy, and more.

This Saturday the state’s online health insurance marketplace, Health Source RI, opens for enrollment. It’s the second open enrollment period since HealthSource launched. This year there a couple of changes.

HealthSource faces an uncertain future in Rhode Island as we have a new governor and funding for the exchange runs out at the end of 2015.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s health care reporter Kristin Gourlay joins host Elisabeth Harrison to talk about what’s new on HealthSource this year, and what to make of the uncertainty.

In a joust that broke little new ground, Ken Block and Cranston Mayor Allan Fung hammered away at each other tonight in a WPRI-Channel 12-Providence Journal televised debate that came a week before their September 9 Republican gubernatorial showdown.

RIPR

The usual special interest groups are blasting the new state budget approved by the General Assembly. But RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says maybe lawmakers did  the best they could in tough times.

Rhode Island’s General Assembly has approved an $8.7 billion taxing and spending plan for the financial year that begins July First. This budget has drawn fire from the usual suspects who roam the marble Statehouse corridors lobbying for their causes.

In a switch, the head of Rhode Island’s version of Obamacare says HealthSourceRI won’t need about $5 million dollars in state funding for the next fiscal year.

HealthSourceRI director Christine Ferguson last week said the exchange would need $4.6 million dollars in state money to keep going next year.