hepatitis c

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

State Medicaid programs – including Rhode Island – fail to provide enough access to cures for hepatitis C. That’s the conclusion of a new report from Harvard Law School’s Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation and the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable. T he authors say restricting treatment is illegal.

FORUM Seizing the Moment to End HepC
Aaron Read

Seizing the Moment to End Hepatitis C:
A Discussion with Experts and Advocates WATCH THE ARCHIVED VIDEO WEBCAST HERE Thursday, November 17, 2016, 6 PM - 7:30 PM
Brown University School of Public Health
121 S. Main Street, 3rd Floor, Providence, RI Hepatitis C is killing more Rhode Islanders today than ever before – especially baby boomers. A new study shows that the disease burden in Rhode Island is much greater than previously believed. The good news is that there’s a...

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island. (Note: Your Weekly Briefing will be on vacation next week.)

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

For the first time, Rhode Island has one of the most complete pictures of the extent of the hepatitis C epidemic. More people are infected, and more are dying from the viral disease than previously known, finds a new study . But more people are also getting treated – and cured.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island. Eliminate Hep C in RI? Brown researchers project more treatment could reduce hepatitis C by 90% in Rhode Island by 2030.

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island: South County Hospital has just achieved a five star quality rating from CMS , the only 5 star rating in RI, and one of just 102 nationally, putting it in the top 2-3% of US hospitals. Some say the rankings are biased against teaching hospitals, which generally attract a sicker, poorer patient population. But the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) say the ratings should help patients/consumers understand more about the hospitals they...

Gilead Sciences

Rhode Island Medicaid is revisiting its policy for determining who receives pricey hepatitis C drugs. Current policy limits who gets treated and when, but those restrictions could be loosened. Most of the new hepatitis C medications on the market can cure patients of the disease in a matter of weeks. But they’re expensive –tens of thousands of dollars per course. So Rhode Island’s health insurance program for the poor has limited the treatment to people in advanced stages of hepatitis C....

From the Annals of Internal Medicine article: Restrictions for Medicaid Reimbursement of Sofosbuvir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the United States / Authors: Soumitri Barua; Robert Greenwald, JD; Jason Grebely, PhD; Gregory J. Dore, MBBS, PhD; Tracy Swan; and Lynn E. Taylor, MD

Medicaid patients in Washington state (a similar suit is underway in Indiana) have sued the state's Medicaid agency claiming they were denied treatment for hepatitis C because of the high cost of the drugs. Litigation director Kevin Costello with the Harvard Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation says his organization has joined the lawsuit.

Gilead Sciences

Federal officials say state Medicaid agencies may be going too far when it comes to restricting access to new hepatitis C drugs. Rhode Island, like many states, requires Medicaid patients to meet a list of criteria before doctors can prescribe them the new medications. But those criteria may be too restrictive. New medications like Sovaldi and Harvoni have been shown to cure most hepatitis C infections. But they’re expensive – tens of thousands of dollars a course. So Rhode Island Medicaid...

From the Annals of Internal Medicine article: Restrictions for Medicaid Reimbursement of Sofosbuvir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the United States / Authors: Soumitri Barua; Robert Greenwald, JD; Jason Grebely, PhD; Gregory J. Dore, MBBS, PhD; Tracy Swan; and Lynn E. Taylor, MD

Hepatitis C may not take as big of a chunk out of the state’s Medicaid budget as previously projected. One reason? A majority of patients who requested treatment have been denied.

World Hepatitis Alliance

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015 marks the 5th annual World Hepatitis Day , a global awareness-raising event launched by the World Hepatitis Alliance , in concert with the World Health Organization. On Saturday, August 1st, Providence marks the occasion with " C is for Cure: A WaterFire Lighting for RI Defeats Hep C ." Global impact, local reach
Hepatitis may sound like one of those far-off diseases afflicting the poor in other places. But it's much more widespread than you might think, and...

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The future of health care for the poor, a review of Rhode Island’s criminal justice system, and politicking in Vermont…that’s part of the conversation this week on Political Roundtable. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay hosts; Ian Donnis is away. We're joined, as always, by URI political science professor Maureen Moakley and RIPR's political analyst Scott MacKay.

NPR's All Things Considered host Audie Cornish interviewed a prominent cancer doctor Monday about his public criticism of the high cost of cancer drugs. Cornish starts by asking Dr. Leonard Saltz, chief of Gastrointestinal Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, to talk about how the high prices of cancer drugs don't seem to be related to their value. Saltz answers that a lot of the drugs being talked about at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, where...

Gilead Sciences

Experts on hepatitis C will present to lawmakers next Tuesday about the disease and how to prevent its spread in the Ocean State. Their presentation comes as state officials look for ways to pay for the growing cost of hepatitis C medications. The high cost of new hepatitis C drugs like Sovaldi could cost Rhode Island’s Medicaid program tens of millions of dollars over the next year. That’s partly because the drugs cost tens of thousands of dollars for a full course, and partly because so...

Aaron Read / RIPR

Our months-long series about hepatitis C, "At the Crossroads: The Rise of Hepatitis C and the Fight to Stop It," has officially come to an end. We had a great public forum ("Hepatitis C: Cost, Cure, and Challenge") last night at Brown University, the audio from which is posted here, and some key takeaways from which I'll share, below. The stories continue
But first: the series may be over, but the stories of patients living with this chronic disease, the stories of people in the depths...

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