higher education

RIPR FILE

The Community College of Rhode Island plans to open a new facility in Westerly to train workers for Electric Boat.

The company needs welders and other specialized employees to build nuclear submarines. Rhode Island Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said the new center is part of an effort to be more responsive to Electric Boat and other companies.

“And we’ve made a commitment to actually have a learning center at Westerly, which is really going to support job opportunity and access not only here in Rhode Island, but also at the Groton, Ct. site,” said Purcell.

The Bottom Line: Women In Technology

Oct 16, 2015

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave discuss the barriers to women in the sciences with Johnson & Wales Dean of Engineering and Design Frank Tweedie, and Department of Engineering and Computer Science Chair Kathryn Parchesco.

  

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island's council for higher education has voted against tuition increases at the University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College and the Community College of Rhode Island. 

In a letter, Governor Gina Raimondo had urged the council to keep tuition at current levels to make college more accessible to students.

"We must make it a priority to ensure that students who work hard, and want to pursue higher education, aren't prevented from doing so by high costs," Raimondo wrote.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A committee searching for the next president of Rhode Island’s community college meets Wednesday, as the group is narrows the field of candidates.


RIPR FILE

At Brown University, a campus-wide survey shows one in four female undergraduates said they had experienced some type of unwanted sexual contact. Further, the survey found ten percent of female undergraduate students had experienced attempted rape. For female graduate students, that number was eight percent.

In a statement Brown's President Christina Paxson said, “[t]he results of the survey establish a clear baseline against which we can assess ourselves going forward."

John Bender / RIPR

In an effort to keep more college graduates in Rhode Island, Roger Williams University is making some changes. The university is preparing to open a $10 million campus in downtown Providence, at the former site of 38 Studios and a marine center in Bristol.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave sit down with Roger Williams University President Donald Farish to discuss what he sees as a growing wealth gap among colleges and universities.

Farish believes federal funding has increasingly become concentrated at a small number of elite institutions, many of which already possess significant resources.

RIPR file photo

Brown University ranks among the top 10 universities whose undergraduates go on to win the prestigious MacArthur "genius" grant, according to new data from the MacArthur Foundation.

Since the foundation began awarding the grants, which honor individuals with great creative potential, Brown graduates have received 14 awards. Harvard produces the most recipients by far with 72 grantees.

RIPR FILE

Ray DiPasquale the President of the Community College of Rhode Island is stepping down. The decision comes after nearly a decade at the helm.

Di Pasquale began his first term as President in 2006.  During his tenure the school has seen record enrollments; graduating it’s largest-ever class in 2013. He also oversaw CCRI’s first-ever capital campaign which raised more $7 million.

In a statement Di Pasquale said serving as CCRI President was a “true privilege.”

There’s a new school where Rhode Islanders can receive a Bachelor’s degree. The school is aimed at students working to complete a degree they started but haven’t finished.

The Rhode Island Senate has approved legislation that would tie some funding for public colleges and universities to their performance. Supporters say the aim is to increase timely graduation rates, and the number of students in high demand fields.

The new legislation would create a set a unique set of standards for the Community College of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College, and the University of Rhode Island, to reach those goals.  Supporters say the bill would shrink the skills gap, by getting students into the workforce quicker with the appropriate education.

Johnson And Wales University Set To Go Tobacco-Free

May 21, 2015
Erika Smith / flickr

Johnson and Wales University is set to become Rhode Island’s first tobacco-free college campus by July 2016. The university will be the 30th campus in New England to make the move, according to the Tobacco Free College Campus Initiative.

  

Johnson and Wales already prohibits the sale and advertising of tobacco products on campus. Spokeswoman Lisa Pelosi said the university hopes to open conversation about the health risks of tobacco use. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

 

This week Mark and Dave speak with Steve Maurano, Associate Vice President of public affairs for Providence College.  The private Catholic institution recently completed an economic impact study. It shows the school has a $200 million dollar impact on the city and state.

 

When to listen

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50pm.

Elisabeth Harrison

New graduates receive diplomas this weekend at the University of Rhode Island. Like grads across the state, they enter a job market showing signs of recovery. But Rhode Island still suffers from one of the worst unemployment rates in the country.

As we continue our series Rising Tide, looking at whether Rhode Island is emerging from the Great Recession, Rhode Island Public Radio’s education reporter Elisabeth Harrison checks in with college students to find out how they view the future.

University of Rhode Island

The University of Rhode Island is arming its police force as of Friday. Preparations have been underway for a little more than a year. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison has details.

A gun scare in 2013 led to the decision last year to arm police on URI's rural Kingston campus. Though it turned out there wasn’t any gun, the false alarm pointed out the drawbacks of unarmed officers, who had to wait for armed police to respond to the incident.

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