Hillary Clinton

  The Republican National Convention that nominated Donald Trump is history. The Democratic convention that is poised to tap Hillary Clinton begins today. 

John Bender / RIPR

Bernie Sanders campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination is winding down. Rhode Island Public Radio political analyst Scott MacKay ponders what’s next for the Vermont senator and the movement he and his followers built. 

Speaking Monday, U.S. Senator Jack Reed echoed calls for unity among Democrats in the lead up to the presidential election. But Reed stopped short of saying it's time for fellow Senator Bernie Sanders to drop out of the Democratic nominating contest. 

"That’s a decision that Senator Sanders is going to have to make," Reed said "But I think it should be clearer and clearer to him that we have to be a united party to be successful in November."

The political season keeps zipping along, with the calendar turning toward May. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, you can share your tips and comments, and follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Insurgent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders won a resounding victory over front-runner Hillary Clinton in Rhode Island’s Democratic presidential primary today. On the Republican side, Donald Trump crushed challengers Ted Cruz and John Kasich.

On a rainy and blustery New England day, voters surged to polls in both primaries to deliver a strong message to the establishment of both major parties, saying emphatically that they aren’t pleased with the status quo.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Hillary Clinton claimed primary victories in Connecticut, Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, but on the Democratic side at least, Rhode Island went its own way. Nearly 55 percent of voters in the Democratic primary chose Sanders, compared with 43 percent for Clinton. Sanders' margin of victory was larger than expected.

Nathania Johnson / Wikimedia Commons/flickr

Coffee mugs, tote bags, and t-shirts: it’s the Presidential campaign swag ubiquitous during election years. This round, you can buy “Feel the Bern” Mugs, ‘Kasich” stickers, and of course, “Make America Great Again” ball caps.

These trinkets are prized mementos for politicos, and they’re big business for the companies who make them. One of those companies is based here in the Ocean State.

Two polls, released just one day apart, provide slightly different views of Rhode Island's presidential primary. While Donald Trump led both polls among Republicans, one poll showed Democrat Bernie Sanders with a lead, and the other favored Hillary Clinton. 

On Monday, a poll released by Public Policy Polling found Sanders leading Clinton by four points thanks to a boost from Independent voters. But the survey called the Democratic races "toss ups" in both Rhode Island and Connecticut.

John Bender / RIPR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders brought his insurgent Democratic presidential primary campaign to Rhode Island Sunday, giving an impassioned speech to 7,000 cheering supporters at a sun-dappled Temple to Music at Roger Williams Park in Providence.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Hillary Clinton was in Central Falls Saturday to campaign in advance of Tuesday’s primary election. 

Rhode Island’s Democractic leadership turned out in force to welcome Clinton, including the state’s congressional delegation and Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Bonus Q&A to talk about lobbying reform, Voter ID, public records, and much more.

Ian Donnis

Former gubernatorial candidate Clay Pell and his wife Michelle Kwan are making the rounds for Hillary Clinton in Rhode Island this week, as the Clinton campaign looks to keep up momentum from a win in New York. Pell spoke at a house party for Clinton in Kingston on Tuesday.

“People were so excited about Hillary, they wanted to know how to get involved to sign up to go knock on doors, to make phone calls, and also to people who were still making up their minds,” said Pell.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

With just five days until Rhode Island’s presidential primary, the campaigns are pushing hard for votes. A close race is expected between Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, and Latino voters could play an important role in the outcome.

Wikimedia Commons

A week after her husband former President Bill Clinton stopped by, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will stump in the Ocean State. Clinton will appear somewhere in the state for a rally Saturday. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse stopped by our studio Friday to discuss a wide range of issues, including the 6/10 Connector, the free speech debate on climate change, the outlook for Hillary Clinton, the plight of the middle class, the threat posed by ISIS, and more.

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