Elected officials and local dignitaries will be on hand to celebrate Women’s History Month at Slater Mill in Pawtucket Monday.

The event will also address economic issues for women. Gendered wage gaps remain persistent in the Ocean State.  That’s according to data from the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island, the advocacy non-profit sponsoring the event.

Featured guest, U.S. Senator Jack Reed, says that makes Slater Mill especially appropriate, due to female mill workers’ early fights for equity.

Newport Historical Society

We continue our series One Square Mile: Narragansett Bay with a look at the bay’s role in the slave trade. Tens of thousands of slaves were traded on ships out of Narragansett Bay, more than any other part of North America.

Newport was at one time the largest slave-trading port in the region. To find out more, Rhode Island Public Radio's education reporter Elisabeth Harrison met Newport history teacher Matt Boyle at Bannisters Wharf, which was built by a merchant involved in the slave trade. She asked him what it would have looked like in mid-18th Century.

Rhode Island Marine Archeology Project

This week, we’re exploring Narragansett Bay. It’s the focus of a regular series called “One Square Mile,” where we dive deep into a particular area of Rhode Island. We’re taking a look at the people and places who make the bay so vital to the Ocean State.

Wikimedia Commons

The Newport Historical Society is working to attract more visitors by drawing more attention to the city’s revolutionary history. Historical Society director Ruth Taylor says they plan to revamp the historic Wanton-Lymon-Hazard house into a museum that brings Newport’s role in the American Revolution to life. Right now, said Taylor, places like Boston and Concord corner the revolutionary tourist market.

“They’re eating our lunch because really important things from the same period happened here. And it’s just less well known," said Taylor.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State officials unveiled a lifelike statue Tuesday of one of the most important figures in Rhode Island history.

The statue of Thomas Dorr was celebrated during an afternoon ceremony outside the Senate chamber at the Statehouse.

State historian Patrick Conley calls Dorr the second most significant figure, after Roger Williams, in Rhode Island history.

Dorr led a rebellion in the early 1840s that led to expanded voting rights. Before the so-called Dorr Rebellion, only property owners were able to vote.

Flo Jonic / RIPR

At Rhode Island College an ambitious project is underway. A group of faculty and students is building online tours of the capital city’s historic North Burial Ground.

Rhode Island College political science professor Francis Leazes admits he’s hooked on cemeteries. And in his view there is no finer from an historical perspective than Providence’s North Burial Ground on North Main Street.

You might think a health care reporter wouldn’t have much interest in covering the Olympics. Think again! (Personally, I can’t wait for the opening ceremonies tonight.)

Thomas Hicks, during 1904 Olympic marathon