this I believe

Local Features
6:19 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

This I Believe Rhode Island: Saying Goodbye

Death.  We know it's coming at some point, and we know it's filled with mystery and, perhaps, some anxiety.  Death is especially difficult when we lose someone we hold near to our hearts.  And when it happens, each of us deals with mortality in whatever way makes sense to us at the time – sometimes with deep anguish, and sometimes with a quiet resolve, equanimity, and acceptance.  Fourteen-year-old Jillian Lombardi talks about her way of coping with the death of someone who was dear to her.

Jillian Lombardi is in the eighth grade at the Moses Brown School in Providence.  She lives with her family in Barrington.

Local Features
8:15 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

This I Believe Rhode Island: Mementos and Memories

Family mementos and memories.  For many of us they’re vitally important – and full of vitality, keeping loved ones near to our hearts, especially once they’re no longer with us.  Precious trinkets, heirlooms, one-of-a-kind photographs, this is the stuff that binds us to the people we care about. The novelist Saul Bellow once wrote, “Everybody needs his memories. They keep the wolf of insignificance from the door.”  And as we hear from Reed Caster in this encore essay, profound connections are sometimes forged from the most modest inheritances.

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Local Features
10:01 am
Wed April 15, 2015

This I Believe Rhode Island: Seasons

No doubt you have noticed how our lives ebb and flow, much like the seasons.  Both literally and figuratively we get to experience the wonder of stunningly beautiful spring days and the bitter assault delivered by the occasional winter blizzard.  Such is life.  Indeed, seasons seem to be able to teach us so much about coping with life's inevitable ups and downs, including its bittersweet moments.  Consider the quote penned by the French Nobel existentialist Albert Camus: “In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."  These are the sentiments echo

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Local Features
6:25 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

This I Believe Rhode Island: Empathy

Empathy – real empathy – is a mysterious phenomenon.  It’s reasonable to ask whether we have the capacity to truly tune into other people’s experiences, particularly when they’re traumatic.  Perhaps we get closest to real empathy when we’re able to draw on our own compelling experiences that somehow approximate those of the people we care about most.  It may not be a perfect fit, but it may be as close as we can get.  And that’s what we hear from B. J. Rich.

B.J. Rich is a nurse clinician and educator. She recently visited England to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Kindertransport and connect with the renowned Attenborough family, who had taken in her mother during World War II.

Local Features
8:03 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

This I Believe Rhode Island: Still Winter

Nature can teach us so much about our world, about its glory and its anguish.  In nature we find so many lessons about hardiness, resilience, triumph and, yes, destruction and death.  The British poet William Wordsworth captured this sentiment in one line of his profound 18th-century poem entitled The Tables Turned: “Come forth into the light of things, let Nature be your teacher.”  And that’s what we hear from Meghan Elizabeth Kallman.
 

Meghan Elizabeth Kallman is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at Brown University. She is a musician, a climate activist, co-founder of the Prison Op/Ed Project, and teaches at the Rhode Island state prison.

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