immigration

Haitian community activists, politicians and local leaders held a press conference and rally on Sunday to support Rhode Island's Haitian community, in reaction to the vulgar comments about certain immigrants attributed to President Trump on Thursday.

Providence City Councilwoman Nirva LaFortune, in a press release, pointed out the fact that the president's comments became widely publicized on the eighth anniversary of Haiti's devastating earthquake of 2010.

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Monday is Martin Luther King Jr. day, the holiday devoted to one of our nation’s premier 20th century civil rights leaders. 

LORNE MATALON / VPR

Washington D.C. has ended a temporary residency program for almost 60,000 Haitians allowed to legally enter the United States following an earthquake in 2010. The affected Haitians will have to leave the U.S. by 2019. The program has also been revoked for 2,000 Nicaraguans and it's unclear if other groups, including 300,000 Salvadorans, will be allowed to remain.

 


It's starting to actually feel like fall, and the news keeps coming fast and furious. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Isaac Bowen / CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

Thursday is the last chance for recipients of the federal immigration program Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals to renew their status. After that, the federal government has announced it will wind down the program, which allows residents brought into the country illegally as children to remain and work without fear of deportation.

Will Hart / Creative Commons License via Wikimedia Commons

It's been a difficult week for people under DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program protecting thousands of undocumented young people from deportation, if their parents brought them to this country as children. 

RIPR FILE

The end of the immigration policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA could leave thousands of undocumented young people without federal protection from deportation. And legal experts say most of them will find it difficult to apply for citizenship.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is joining with counterparts in other states to sue the federal government over the end of the DACA program. The U.S. Justice Department announced Tuesday that it would end the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The program, implemented in 2012, allowed undocumented residents brought to the country as children to defer deportation.

MAYOR MCGINN / Creative Commons License

President Donald Trump's likely repeal of a program that protects some undocumented immigrants from deportation would threaten thousands across New England, placing some in dire situations.

marclevitt.org

The triple-decker, in some places, is a big sandwich. But here in New England, the triple-decker is a particular kind of rental housing: a three-story apartment building, usually of wood-frame construction, with each floor consisting of one apartment. 

RIPR in the Classroom: Travel Ban Splits Families

Aug 14, 2017

Listenwise helps teachers use stories from RIPR in their classrooms. To find more public radio stories and lessons for your middle and high school ELA, social studies, and science classrooms you can sign up for a free Listenwise account!

Story Synopsis

Joe Difazio / WBUR

Massachusetts' highest court ruled Monday that local law enforcement officials do not have the authority, under state law, to detain a person based solely on a request from federal immigration authorities.

Shannon Dooling / WBUR

Immigrants across the country are experiencing changes in the way the federal government enforces immigration law under the Trump administration. In New England, some immigrants lacking documentation have been detained even though they have no criminal background. 

Kathleen Masterson / Vermont Public Radio

A Vermont father of six is facing deportation to Mexico in a case that highlights shifting federal immigration enforcement priorities.

It may not yet be time to cue The Final Countdown, but we're getting there with House Finance signing off on a new state budget. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Pages