Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources and Vermont Public Radio

It’s been a matter of ‘when’, not ‘if’: For years state officials have been expecting the destructive emerald ash borer to turn up in Vermont. Tuesday, the state announced it has found an infestation of the insect in part of the town of Orange.

Janet Graham / Creative Commons License

The invasive moths are native to Europe and first appeared in New England around 2004. The females lay their eggs between Thanksgiving and the New Year, and their offspring can cause extensive damage to foliage when they hatch as caterpillars in the spring.

Heather Faubert, a research associate at the University of Rhode Island, said so far there’s only one real way to deal with winter months.  

Todd Ugine / Cornell University Department of Entomology

Scientists have confirmed a sighting of a rare ladybug at Rocky Point in Warwick.  The nine-spotted ladybug, once common in the eastern U.S. has almost disappeared. Volunteers with the Rhode Island Natural History Survey found one of the ladybugs during an expedition last year.  Natural History Survey Executive Director David Gregg says Warwick is not a place he would have expected to make a scientific find.


Invasive Beetle and Borer: "We're Pretty Much Surrounded"

Jun 28, 2013

The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management is once again urging summer campers not to move firewood from outside the state. That’s to keep from spreading a couple of tree-killing invasive insects, which, so far, haven’t shown up in Rhode Island. But this year, they’re closer than ever.