Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence

The Elmwood U.S. Post Office in Providence is being officially named for the late Sister Ann Keefe, a beloved Roman Catholic nun who served for more than 30 years at St. Michael the Archangel parish in Providence.

Sister Ann, as she was universally known, died earlier this year after a long battle with brain cancer at age 62.

Aaron Read / RIPR

Congressman David Cicilline introduced a bill in House of Representatives bill Tuesday to name a South Providence post office after Sister Ann Keefe. Keefe was a community activist, who passed away last month from brain cancer.

Cicilline worked with Keefe for many years. She launched at least 22 organizations, including Providence CityArts for Youth and Providence’s Institute for the Study & Practice of Nonviolence.

Don Boorman / RIPR

In the aftermath of last year’s Newtown school shootings, Rhode Island politicians leaped on the gun control bandwagon. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what’s happened since.

After last December’s horrific school massacre in Connecticut, political leaders from the White House to the Rhode Island State House vowed to crack down on gun violence. Gov. Lincoln Chafee, Attorney General Peter Kilmartin, House Speaker Gordon Fox and Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed all advocated measures to advance gun control in our state.

Visitors from Chicago and Newark, New Jersey, are completing on Friday a two-day visit examining the work of the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence.

Christopher Mallette heads a three-year-old program called the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy. Mallette says the Chicago strategy, like the one in Providence, utilizes street workers who try to mediate disputes and prevent violent conflicts.

With the rising temperatures comes a spike in crime across the capital city. In a series we’re calling Hot City: Crime in Providence we’re taking a look at summer crime by focusing the month of July.

Last year the area encompassing Smith Hill, Elmhurst and the north end saw the highest number of crimes. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch sat down with Teny Gross, executive director of the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence about what’s happening on the streets of Providence.

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