James Diossa

This week marked the one-year point until Rhode Island's decisive 2014 primary. Welcome back to my Friday column. Feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to stay posted via Twitter. Let's head in.

John Bender / RIPR

Central Falls Mayor James Diossa will run unopposed for re-election in November, and he leads a city that still bears scars from its closely watched municipal bankruptcy.

The group Leadership Rhode Island stepped in after the bankruptcy and tried to convince Central Falls residents to get more engaged politically.

Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison asked Leadership Rhode Island’s Executive Director Mike Ritz for some analysis of the upcoming mayoral race.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The mayor of Central Falls, 28-year-old James Diossa, won’t face any competition when voters in Rhode Island’s smallest city go to the polls in November. Diossa is backing a slate of city council candidates – and most of them don’t face any competition, either. The tiny and financially struggling city is still emerging from the shadow of bankruptcy. But the political landscape marks quite a change from last year, when Diossa beat the city’s former police chief to win election as Central Falls’ first Latino mayor.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Central Falls Mayor James Diossa won’t have any competition when he seeks re-election this fall.  Diossa won election last year as the first Latino mayor in the predominantly minority city.

Diossa will have a clean shot to win a three-year term when Central Falls voters go to the polls in November. The 28-year-old mayor says he’s humbled by what he calls a vote of confidence in his leadership.

The City of Central Falls plans to repair and pave 16 roads. Mayor James Diossa said the Pawtucket Water Supply Board is ripping up the roads to make repairs to water mains. Instead of just patching the roads back together, the city will completely repave them.

“Pawtucket Water Supply opens up the roads and they were willing to grid the roads and leave it to the point where we just have to cover it with asphalt,” said Diossa, “so that’s why it’s very, very cheap for 16 roads.”