Jamestown

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island is losing salt marshes at an alarming rate. Scientists and coastal planners say this is one of the most pressing climate change impacts already facing the Ocean State. Salt marshes are critical fish and wildlife habitats that support the state's fishing and tourism industries.

Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation

Scientists are embarking upon a major campaign to get wild heron back on Rose Island.  Over the last decade the birds have disappeared from the island which sits between Newport and Jamestown in Narragansett Bay. .

Some 300 hundred pair of heron nested on the island until the mid-2000’s.  That number has dwindled to zero. The island’s caretakers think human activity, and environmental changes are to blame.   They’re fundraising to bring the birds back.  Rick Best is a spokesman for the Rhode Island Lighthouse Foundation.

Newport Naval Station

The decommissioned USS Saratoga has left the Newport Naval Station. The weather finally cleared for the ship’s departure for 8:45am Thursday.

The Saratoga is heading down the eastern seaboard and around the tip of Florida to Brownsville, Texas where it will be pulled apart for scrap.

The 1950’s aircraft carrier was decommissioned 20 years ago. An effort failed to turn it into a museum and it sat in Newport for sixteen years.

Naval Station spokeswoman Lisa Rama said the Saratoga’s departure has left a hole in the landscape.

One of the biggest nostrums these days from conservatives and some elements of the business community is that our governments, at both the state and national levels, should cut down on regulation and oversight of business.

While it makes sense to streamline regulations that hamper small business, in particular, it is also instructive to parse our history for instances where lax regulation caused pain for our people and our economy.

Rhode Island’s politicians are talking about the economy again. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay warns of a campaign cliché voters ought to view with skepticism.

As predictable as the turning of autumn leaves, Rhode Island’s political campaigns will once again be filled with talk about creating jobs and jump-starting our stalled economy. Expect to hear the ancient Ocean State chestnut from the pols who’ll say, the biggest economic fear of Rhode Islanders is that their children can’t stay in our state because there aren’t enough jobs.

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