Jim Vincent

Elisabeth Harrison

After the release of a video showing a Texas traffic stop that escalates into an arrest for Sandra Bland, an African-American woman who was later found dead in a prison cell, some Rhode Islanders say they are disturbed, but not surprised. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison has our story.

In a patch of shade across the street from Pawtucket City Hall, Dwayne Adams sighs deeply and says yes, he has heard about Sandra Bland.

Providence NAACP branch President Jim Vincent talks with Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison, and WPRI investigative reporter Tim White, about community-race relations in the state, as the media has turned its focus from the demonstrations this summer.  Vincent also weighs in on the lack of diversity in state government, and asks what National Black History month really achieves.

Hear more of our conversation with Jim Vincent in our Political Roundtable

President of the NAACP Providence branch Jim Vincent joins the Political Roundtable this week.  Vincent weighs in on the recent sale of the Pawtucket Red Sox, and the team's possible move to Providence. He also discusses the resignation of Rhode Island Health Department head Michael Fine and the American Civil Liberties Union report on racial disparities in Rhode Island's schools and prison system.

Hear more of our conversation with Jim Vincent in our Bonus Q&A.

John Bender / RIPR

Elected leaders and state officials celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with events across the state.  Many will attend a celebration at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Providence this afternoon.  NAACP Providence director Jim Vincent said he wants to see those leaders hire more staff of color.  “25 percent of Rhode Island is communities of color.  Those staffs don’t have to exactly mirror the population that, but they should somewhat, so that people can see demonstrated leadership; we know that you’re here, we hear you, and we want to work on all these problems together. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Recent grand jury decisions in Ferguson, Missouri, and Staten Island, New York, have sparked a national focus on police-community relations. At issue is a number of cases in which unarmed black men have been killed during encounters with white police officers. Rhode Island hasn’t seen this much concern about police-community relations since a black police officer was killed in a friendly-fire incident almost 15 years ago. So how much things have changed?

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