Ken Block

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung has hired three consultants for his Republican gubernatorial campaign:

Via news release:

Gubernatorial candidate Ken Block, who joined the Republican Party last month, is looking to burnish his GOP credentials by attending a Republican Governors Association training session for candidates in Arizona later this month. Cranston Mayor Allan Fung also plans to attend the get-together in Scottsdale on November 21-22.

In a statement, Block says he was happy to be invited and hopes to learn from Republican governors:

RIPR FILE

What is the Tea Party’s future in Rhode Island Republican politics? Rhode Island Public Radio political analyst Scott MacKay talks tea about two announced GOP candidates for governor.

Scott MacKay’s commentary can be heard every Monday on Morning Edition at 6:35 and 8:35 and on All Things Considered at 5:50. You can also follow his political analysis and reporting at our ‘On Politics’ blog at RIPR.org.

Welcome back to my Friday column. Thanks for stopping by and, as always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

What is the tea party’s future in Rhode Island Republican politics? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay talks tea with the two announced GOP candidates for governor.

In April, 2010, at the height of the tea party insurgency, then-Rhode Island Gov. Don Carcieri addressed a boisterous rally on the south steps of the Statehouse. To 500 or  so  tea party activists, Carcieri bellowed, ``I love the tea party, I love the tea party.’’

Republican candidate for governor Ken Block joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss the economy, Sakonnet tolls, his view of budget savings, and a host of other issues.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Republican candidate for governor Ken Block joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss his campaign; why he became a Republican; the fate of the Moderate Party; his plan to save $1 billion over four years; and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Do voters really want substance in their candidates?

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Allan Fung, the three-term mayor of Cranston, unveiled himself Monday as Rhode Island's Great Republican Hope, emphasizing his plan for improving the state's economy and education system while paying homage to his family's immigrant roots in kicking off his long-anticipated run for governor.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Two days after he announced his gubernatorial campaign, Providence Mayor Angel Taveras collected the endorsement on Wednesday of the Rhode Island State Association of Fire Fighters outside a Cranston fire house.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung is set to announce his Republican run for governor at 10 a.m. Monday at Taco, the Cranston-based manufacturer, according to campaign spokesman Patrick Sweeney. The campaign launch also includes a rally at 6 that evening at Chapel Grille at Sockanosset Crossroads.

John Bender / RIPR

The founder of the Moderate Party of Rhode Island is scrapping that effort to instead run for governor as a Republican. Ken Block got six and a half percent of the vote as a Moderate candidate for governor in 2010.

When he established the Moderate Party in 2008, Block called it a pragmatic and centrist way to improve Rhode Island politics. But Block says he’s realized that third parties aren’t an effective way to make change.

Sue Stenhouse, a well-connected veteran of local GOP politics, is set to join Cranston Mayor Allan Fung's administration as Fung prepares to launch his Republican run for governor next week.

Fung faces a primary challenge from Moderate-turned-Republican Ken Block.

According to an agenda for a Monday evening meeting of the Cranston City Council, Stenhouse is due to be appointed as the city's director of senior services.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence Mayor Angel Taveras formally launched his long-anticipated Democratic gubernatorial campaign on Monday, describing himself as the person best suited by experience and temperament to lead Rhode Island forward.

It looks increasingly likely that Moderate Party founder Ken Block will make his second run for governor as a Republican.

In a suggestion that he's leaning toward becoming a Republican, Block is downplaying early GOP support for Cranston Mayor Allan Fung.

"Early support, it's sort of fleeting," says Block. He says he's decided on the party affiliation he'll use in making his second run for governor, but declined to specify it in advance of an upcoming announcement "soon."

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