law enforcement

Former attorney general Arlene Violet joins Bonus Q&A this week to discuss Cranston Mayor Allan Fung and the State Police report on the Cranston Police Department; where the RI GOP has gone wrong in building an effective opposition; and much more. For more Violet, check her appearance on this week's Political Roundtable.

RIPR FILE

Faith leaders and law enforcement from across the state will gather Tuesday night to pray for peace.

After the shooting deaths of two New York policemen, and the events in Ferguson, Missouri, Rev. Robert Marciano thought it would set a tone in Rhode Island if there was a prayer for peace, for law enforcement, and for those who strive for justice.

“The power of prayer can make a difference. And coming together, getting to know each other, as well as praying together is nothing but a win-win for everyone,” said Marciano.

Gift-getting, holiday cheer, staffing up and then -- boom! -- a New Year will be here, full of exciting stories yet to happen. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Feel free to drop me tips/comments at idonnis (at) ripr (org) and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

Garry Bliss / The Providence Center

We had a full house at the Providence Athenaeum last week. If you weren't able to join us, not to worry. You can listen to the full program right here.

Rhode Island Public Radio, in concert with the lovely Providence Athenaeum, hosted a stellar group of panelists for this one hour radio show taped in front of a live audience. Guests included a recovering addict and overdose survivor, an addiction medicine and infectious disease specialist, a drug abuse epidemiologist, a Warwick police captain trained in mental health first aid, and an addiction treatment specialist.

Ian Donnis

US Attorney Peter Neronha is Rhode Island's top federal prosecutor. His office prosecutes about 40 or so gun-related cases each year, some of them with far stiffer sentences than state prosecutions. But Neronha says prosecutions are just one part of what it will take to reduce gun-related crime. He also questions the view among some in law enforcement that federal sentencing has a stronger deterrent effect in gun cases.