lead paint

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The U.S. Housing and Urban Development agency is proposing lowering its threshold for childhood lead poisoning to match recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

Rhode Island will receive $3.4 million dollars to reduce lead hazards in homes. It's the seventh round of funding in more than a decade aimed at hundreds of homes with lead contamination.

Rhode Island Housing will distribute the funds to organizations that help identify homes at the highest risk for lead. These apartments or houses built were before 1978, when a ban on lead paint went into effect. And Rhode Island has a high percentage of older apartment buildings compared to the rest of the nation.

RIPR FILE

The U.S. outlawed lead paint in 1978. Yet it still covers the walls of many older homes, particularly here in the northeast. When that paint chips or peels, it poses a serious danger especially to kids. But in 2005, Rhode Island passed a law requiring some landlords to clean up lead paint. And a group of researchers recently set out to find out if it’s working. Hasbro Children’s Hospital pediatrician and Brown University school of public health associate professor doctor Patrick Vivier is one of those researchers.

Bart Everson / Flickr

A law aimed at protecting children from unsafe levels of lead in their homes is working, according to a new study. But only when landlords comply with it.