Lincoln Chafee

Jason Schwartz, who wrote the definitive story on the 38 Studios saga for Boston Magazine, tells NECN the short version is this: the company “never really had a chance.”

Even with what often seems like a tepid recovery, the United States is working its way back toward a muscular economy — if you believe the Economist.

The sharp-eyed British newsmagazine points to a number of factors: under-valued homes, increasing exports, the growing “app economy,” and more. So if the nation can do it, what about the perennial sick man of the New England states?

Narragansett Chief Sachem Matthew Thomas can only watch in frustration as 1) Massachusetts moves ahead with plans for expanded gambling in nearby Taunton; and Rhode Island’s slot parlors spend heavily in hopes of adding table games at Twin River and Newport Grand.

Governor Lincoln Chafee says he’s vindicated by testimony offered yesterday during a meeting in Wilmington, Delaware, on the bankruptcy of Curt Schilling’s failed video game company, 38 Studios.

Despite repeated and sustained requests for interviews from a bevy of Rhode Island news organizations, Curt Schilling and his wife Shonda continue to utilize Facebook to fire back at reports emanating from the Ocean State.

In a scathing news release, Narragansett Chief Sachem Matthew Thomas outlines a litany of grievances involving Rhode Island’s likely expansion of state-sponsored gambling and calls for a meeting with Governor Lincoln Chafee, House Speaker Gordon Fox, and Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed “to address this disgraceful situation.”

House Speaker Gordon Fox is distancing himself from responsibility for the demise of 38 Studios.

Moody’s Investors Service says the $8.1 billion budget signed into law by Governor Lincoln Chafee on June 15 “is credit positive for Central Falls and schools, but leaves Woonsocket and pensions unaddressed.”

Moody’s points to “a material increase in funding for schools” — $34 million, or almost 4 percent, “marking the third consecutive annual increase in school funding. State funding for education now stands at over $900 million, well above pre-recession peak.”

Lawyer Max Wistow, a partner in the Providence firm of Wistow & Barylick, was hired by the state today to try to reduce the roughly $100 million liability faced by taxpayers due to the meltdown of 38 Studios.

After being introduced by Governor Chafee during a Statehouse news conference, Wistow said he couldn’t offer specifics on his approach since he’d just started on the job as a special counsel for the state Economic Development Corporation.

A series of union lawsuits filed today in Superior Court — aimed at stopping the sweeping state pension overhaul enacted last year — shouldn’t come as a surprise, says Robert Walsh, executive director of the National Education Association Rhode Island. He says opponents made their stance clear before the overhaul was passed by the legislature and signed into law by Governor Lincoln Chafee.

The worst-kept secret in state government came to an end this morning when Governor Chafee introduced Christine Ferguson as the director of the Rhode Island Health Benefits Exchange. Ferguson has a long history in health policy, and she says the exchange offers the promise of cutting healthcare costs:

Governor Lincoln Chafee has issued the following statement in response to the indication by federal prosecutors today that they intend to use the death penalty against Jayson Pleau:

State Revenue Director Rosemary Booth Gallogly has strong words for state Representatives Lisa Baldelli-Hunt, Jon Brien, and Robert Phillips after they failed to back a supplemental tax for cash-strapped Woonsocket in last-minute negotiations in the waning hours of the legislative session: