lobster

Newport Lobster Shack / Facebook

A lobster that looks bluer than the sky has been released back in to the ocean after a brief stay at the Newport Lobster Shack. Blue lobsters are rare, but they’re caught more often than you might think. 

According to Maine’s Lobster Institute, only about one in two million lobsters are blue. It’s small number, but  Bob Bayer, Lobster Institute's Executive Directos, said they’re common enough to be seen every year. 

Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Lobster conservation techniques pioneered by Maine fishermen helped drive a population boom that's led to record landings this century. That's the conclusion of new, peer-reviewed research published this month. 

The paper also finds that lobstermen in southern New England could have used the same techniques to prevent or at least slow the collapse of their fisheries — even in the face of climate change — but they didn't.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Environmental Reporter, Ambar Espinoza will host a public forum and conversation on the changing fisheries in Narragansett Bay.

This forum will be broadcast live on Thursday, October 9, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM on Rhode Island Public Radio: 88.1 FM/102.7 FM/91.5 FM and RIPR.ORG.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Lobster fishermen, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Sen. Jack Reed, and other state leaders celebrated the grand opening of a new kitchen facility in Newport on Friday. The Newport Lobster Shack Kitchen, owned and run jointly by commercial lobster fishermen, sells freshly cooked food made directly from lobsters landed at Pier Nine on Long Wharf. 

DEM Director Janet Coit said many state leaders showed up to push a growing local seafood marketing effort in Rhode Island.