local feature

Patrick Shahill/WNPR

A giant, miles-long tunnel is about to be drilled hundreds of feet beneath Connecticut’s capital. This subterranean project will take years, cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and the hope is, result in cleaner water for the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. A similar project has improved pollution but raised prices significantly for sewer customers in Rhode Island.

This I Believe New England: Identity

Nov 7, 2017
Scott Indermaur

The famed writer and poet Gertrude Stein once said, ''Growing has no connection with audience. Audience has no connection with identity." Stein's claim, it seems, is that our true identity is embedded deep within each of us and develops over the years in its own inexorable way.  Sometimes this journey is relatively smooth.  Alas, sometimes it's not, as we hear in this encore essay by Alex Myers. 

Ryan Caron King/WNPR

Blanca Ortiz-Torres was sitting in a Puerto Rican oasis. She was at a working bakery in the tiny mountain town of Maricao that had both a generator and a cistern and, as a result, could serve cold drinks, hot coffee, fresh pastries, and pizza.

But she wasn’t happy about it. 

RIPR File Photo

The director of the National Endowment for the Humanities met with nonprofit leaders in Rhode Island on Friday, urging them to continue seeking funding from his agency even though it faces an uncertain future.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Inside a conference center in Cranston, Robert Collington tried to find out what he’ll have to pay for his health plan come January. He’d come to the state’s open enrollment fair to meet with a health insurance navigator, who was helping him sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

RIPR File Photo

For immigrants in the country illegally, the fear of running into U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents has made some public places appear threatening. In the current environment, that can include a visit to the emergency room.


GateHouse Media Inc. snatched up another Southern New England newspaper this week with its purchase of the Newport Daily News. This adds to more than 100 publications in GateHouse's portfolio, including The Providence Journal, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette, The Fall River Herald and The New Bedford Standard Times.


Avory Brookins / RIPR

 

Ravens have historically been depicted in popular culture as creepy and supernatural, from the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe to – more recently – the popular TV series, Game of Thrones.

RIPR

In this multi-part series, "Striking a New Chord: A 15-Week Journey To Learning An Instrument," RIPR’s Morning Edition host Chuck Hinman follows a beginning adult ensemble class for violin, viola, cello and bass in Bristol, RI.


Mark Turek / Courtesy of Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep continues its season with "Skeleton Crew." The play is set in Detroit but could be almost anywhere USA. Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale says it's a production with many strong points and some problems too.


John Bender / RIPR

Across the country, and in New England, elementary schools are revamping recess with a focus on organized games and teamwork, instead of free play.

Ian Donnis

A longtime community activist is running to be Providence's next mayor. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Construction is under way at the Wexford Innovation Complex in the I-195 District in Providence. Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo calls the project a game-changer for the state’s economy. But is the governor’s optimism justified?

KATHLEEN MASTERSON / Vermont Public Radio

 

To prevent their collective cultural knowledge about medicinal plants from disappearing, some Vermont tribal nations are sharing their expertise with those outside the native communities.

Mark Turek / Courtesy of Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep is opening its season with Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” the powerful drama concerning the downside of the American Dream. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale has the review.

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